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You are here: Platypus /Archive for tag Art and Politics
Liberty Leading the People, Eugène Delacroix

Sunday 21st June - Sunday 23rd August

Time: 16:00 - 18:30 (BST)

Reading group sessions will take place on ZOOM (link: https://lse.zoom.us/j/97132319483)

• required / + recommended reading


Week 1. Art and politics after postmodernism | June 21, 2020

“[Artists'] work is to sustain the critical moment of aesthetic experience. [Critics' work] is to recognize it.”
-- Susan Buck-Morss, response to Visual culture questionnaire (1996)

• Susan Buck-Morssresponse to Visual culture questionnaire (1996)
• Robert Pippin"On Critical Theory" (2004)
Being and becoming (freedom in transformation) / immanent dialectical critique chart of terms [PNG]
• Chris Cutrone"The relevance of Critical Theory to art today" (2011)
• Cutrone"An incomplete project? Art and politics after postmodernism" (2010)


Week 2. The meaning of art | June 28, 2020

Being and becoming (freedom in transformation) / immanent dialectical critique chart of terms [PNG]
+ Kant's 3 Critiques [PNG] and philosophy [PNG] charts of terms
• Immanuel KantPreface and IntroductionCritique of Judgment (1790) [full book PDF]


Week 3. Art and humanity | July 5, 2020

Schiller on aesthetic education (and Nietzsche on art) chart of terms [PNG]
• Friedrich SchillerLetters on the Aesthetic Education of Man (1794)


Week 4. Modern aesthetics of art | July 12, 2020

• G.W.F. HegelIntroductory Lectures on Aesthetics (Introduction): [PDF]
Prefatory Remarks
Limitation and Defence of Aesthetics
Refutation of Objections
Scientific Ways of Treating Beauty and Art
Concept of the Beauty of Art
Common Ideas of Art
(i) The Work of Art as a Product of Human Activity
(ii) The Work of Art, as being for Apprehension by Man’s Senses, is drawn from the Sensuous Sphere
(iii) The Aim of Art


Week 5. Modernity and modernism | July 19, 2020

• Heinrich Heineexcerpts from Salon of 1831 (1831)
• Heineexcerpts from Salon of 1843(1843)
Baudelaire on the modern / modernity / modernism chart of terms [PNG]
• Charles Baudelaireexcerpts from Paris Spleen (1867)
• Baudelaireexcerpts from Salon of 1846 (1846)
• Baudelaireexcerpts from The Painter of Modern Life (1863)


Week 6. Art as justification for life? | July 26, 2020

• Friedrich NietzscheThe Birth of Tragedy (1872, including 1886 "Attempt at self-criticism")
Schiller on aesthetic education (and Nietzsche on art) chart of terms [PNG]


Week 7. Art and revolution | August 2, 2020

“[A] protest against reality, either conscious or unconscious, active or passive, optimistic or pessimistic, always forms part of a really creative piece of work. Every new tendency in art has begun with rebellion.”
— Trotsky, “Art and politics in our epoch” (1938)

• Walter Benjamin"On the mimetic faculty" (1934)
• Cutrone"Trotsky, Benjamin, Adorno and Greenberg's critique of 'revolutionary art' " (2020) [PDF]
• Leon Trotsky"Art and politics in our epoch" (1938)
• Clement Greenberg"Avant-garde and kitsch" (1939)


Week 8. Revolutionary art? | August 9, 2020

• Walter Benjamin"Experience and poverty" (1934)
• Benjamin"The author as producer" (1934)
• Jürgen Habermas"Modernity: an incomplete project" (1981)


Week 9. Art and capitalism | August 16, 2020

• Benjamin"The work of art in the age of mechanical reproduction" (1936)
• Theodor Adorno, letter to Benjamin (1936)
+ Siegfried Kracauer, "Photography" (1927)
+ Benjamin, "Little history of photography" (1931)


Week 10. Art's necessity and impossibility | August 23, 2020

• Adorno"Those Twenties" (1962)
• Adorno"Art's self-evidence lost" and "Society"Aesthetic Theory (1970)
• Stewart Martin“Critique of relational aesthetics” (2007)
• Stewart Martin“The absolute artwork meets the absolute commodity” (2007)

Platypus Frankfurt lädt zum Ferienlesekreis über "Kunst und Politik".

Ort: Zoom, Link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89725048788
Zeit: Immer Dienstags 18–21 Uhr
Erster Termin: 23.06.2020

Die Texte werden zu Hause gelesen und beim Lesekreis besprochen. Kein Vorwissen ist nötig. Neue Gesichter sind immer gern gesehen.
● vorausgesetzte Texte / + zusätzlich empfohlene Texte

Vorausgesetzte Lektüre:
• Chris Cutrone et al., “The relevance of Critical Theory to art today” (2011)


Woche 1. Nach der Postmoderne: Kunst und Politik? | 23. Juni 2020

• Susan Buck-Morss, Susan Buck-Morss, Response to Visual culture questionnaire (1996)
• Robert Pippin, "On Critical Theory" (2004)

+ Being and becoming (freedom in transformation) / immanent dialectical critique chart of terms

• Chris Cutrone, "The relevance of Critical Theory to art today" (2011)
• Chris Cutrone, "An incomplete project? Art and politics after postmodernism" (2010)

Woche 2. Die Bedeutung von Kunst | 30. Juni 2020

• Immanuel Kant, Vorwort und Einleitung zur Kritik der Urteilskraft (1790)

+ Being and becoming (freedom in transformation) / immanent dialectical critique chart of terms
+ Kant's 3 Critiques
and philosophy

Woche 3. Die Kunst und die Menschheit | 7. Juli 2020

• Friedrich Schiller, Briefe über die ästhetische Erziehung des Menschen (1794)

+ Schiller on aesthetic education (and Nietzsche on art) chart of terms

Woche 4. Moderne Ästhetik der Kunst | 14. Juli 2020

• G.W.F. Hegel, Vorlesungen über die Ästhetik, Erster Abschnitt:
"Einleitung" bis (inklusive) "3. Zweck der Kunst" (1835)

Woche 5. Moderne und Modernismus | 21. Juli 2020

• Heinrich Heine, Auszüge aus Der Salon 1 (1831)
• Heinrich Heine, Auszüge aus Der Salon 2 (1843)

+ Baudelaire on the modern / modernity / modernism chart of terms

• Charles Baudelaire, Auszüge aus Pariser Spleen (1867)
• Charles Baudelaire, Auszüge aus Salon 1846 (1846)
• Charles Baudelaire, Auszuüge aus die Blumen des Bösen (1857)
• Charles Baudelaire, Auszüge aus Der Maler des modernen Lebens (1863)

Woche 5.2 Die Kunst und die Revolution [I] | 21. Juli 2020

• Richard Wagner, "Die Kunst und die Revolution" (1849)

Woche 6. Kunst als Rechtfertigung des Lebens? | 28. Juli 2020

• Friedrich Nietzsche, "Die Geburt der Tragödie aus dem Geiste der Musik" (1872, inklusive des "Versuch einer Selbstkritik“ von 1886)

+ Schiller on aesthetic education (and Nietzsche on art) chart of terms

Woche 7. Kunst und Revolution [II] | 11. August 2020

• Walter Benjamin, "Über das mimetische Vermögen" (1934)
• Chris Cutrone, "Trotsky, Benjamin, Adorno and Greenberg's critique of 'revolutionary art' " (2020)
• Leon Trotzki, "Kunst und Revolution. Leserbrief an den New Yorker Partisan Review“ (1939)
• Clement Greenberg, "Avant-garde and kitsch" (1939)

Woche 8. Revolutionäre Kunst? | 18. August 2020

• Walter Benjamin, "Erfahrung und Armut" (1934)
• Walter Benjamin, "Der Autor als Produzent" (1934)
• Jürgen Habermas, "Die Moderne – ein unvollendest Projekt" (1981)

Woche 9. Kunst und Kapitalismus | 25. August 2020

• Walter Benjamin, "Das Kunstwerk im Zeitalter seiner technischen Reproduzierbarkeit" (1936)
• Theodor W. Adorno „an Walter Benjamin“, Brief vom 18. März 1936
• Siegfried Kracauer, „Die Photographie“ (1927)
• Walter Benjamin, „Kleine Geschichte der Photographie" (1931)

Woche 10. Die Notwendigkeit und Unmöglichkeit der Kunst | 01. September 2020

• Theodor W. Adorno, "Jene zwanziger Jahre" (1962)
• Theodor Adorno, Ästhetische Theorie (1970): „Selbstverständlichkeit von Kunst verloren“ (S. 9–11) und „Gesellschaft“ (S. 334–389)
• Stewart Martin, “Critique of relational aesthetics” (2007)
• Stewart Martin, “The absolute artwork meets the absolute commodity” (2007)


Alle pdf-Texte (ohne online-Quellen) in Reihenfolge

On September 21, 2012, Chris Mansour interviewed Ste­phen Eric Bronner, a professor at Rutgers University and author of Rosa Luxemburg: A Revolutionary for Our Times (1980), Socialism Unbound (1990), Of Critical Theory and Its Theorists (1994), and Reclaiming the En­lightenment: Toward a Politics of Radical Engagement (2004), among many others. His most recent book is Mod­ernism at the Barricades: Aesthetics, Politics, and Uto­pia. What follows is an edited transcript of the interview.
At the 2011 Left Forum, held at Pace University between March 18–21, Platypus hosted a conversation on the theme of Aesthetics in Protests. Panelists Stephen Duncombe (Reclaim the Streets), Marc Herbst (Journal of Aesthetics and Protest), Chris Mansour (Platypus), Laurel Whitney (The Yes Men), were asked to consider: “What are the historical roots that contribute to the use of current aesthetic interventions in political protests? In what ways do they expand or limit the possibilities for protests to transform the social order? How does experimenting with aesthetic and artistic sensibilities influence our political consciousness and practice?” The same theme was the subject of another event held at the New School in NYC on May 23, which featured Marc Herbst (Journal of Aesthetics and Protest), Chris Mansour (Platypus), A.K. Burns (W.A.G.E.), and Beka Economopoulos (Not An Alternative). The article that follows is a modified version of the opening remarks made by Chris Mansour of Platypus at both events.