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The political and cultural Left, which have stood for increasing the scope of freedom, have historically shifted positons on issues of gender and sexuality. For instance, where once the Left challenged gender and family norms in society, there has been a turn to advocation participation in predominant institutions, for instance in legal reforms and the medical industry: there has been some conflict in LGBTQ circles over the politcs of the trans identity, whether it should be considered a subjective development or an objective condition, and further if it should be considered at all by the Left. What do such controversies tell us about the politics of sexual freedom and the history of the Left, moving forward? How are issues of sexual freedom related to issues in the greater society and not of concern merely to sexual minorities and subcultures? Is there simply a need to be recognized as present, as expressed by Queer Nation? Or might we look forward to renewed politcal disputes around issues of sexual freedom? What can history teach us about this?

Which way forward for trans liberation?
Which way forward for human emancipation?

"Es ist sicherlich nicht einfach, das globale Kapital zu begreifen und ihm entgegenzutreten – in jedem Fall ist es von entscheidender Bedeutung, einen Internationalismus wieder herzustellen und neu zu formulieren, der ohne jeden Dualismus auskommt. Wer am verdinglichten Dualismus des Kalten Krieges festhält, läuft Gefahr, eine Politik zu treiben, die vom Standpunkt menschlicher Emanzipation, vom Standpunkt des »Kommunismus« aus, bestenfalls fragwürdig wäre, wie viele Menschen sie auch ansprechen mag."

- Moishe Postone "Geschichte und Ohnmacht" (2005)

Eine moderierte Podiumsdiskussion über Fragen des globalen Kapitals, Imperialismus und Krieg, die Möglichkeiten für progressive politische Opposition und die Probleme und Aufgaben einer Linken in einer Welt nach dem "Kalten Krieg" und nach "9/11", wie sie durch die Invasion und Besetzung von Afghanistan und Irak und den militärischen Interventionen in Libyen, Jemen und Syrien gestellt wurden.

Mit:

Manfred Dahlmann (Ca ira, sans phrase)
Matthias (Gruppe Arbeitermacht, Liga fĂĽr die 5. Internationale)
Jan Schröder (Platypus)

Podiumsdiskussion am 16.06.2016: Was ist Imperialismus? Warum sollten wir dagegen sein?

 

"Es ist sicherlich nicht einfach, das globale Kapital zu begreifen und ihm entgegenzutreten – in jedem Fall ist es von entscheidender Bedeutung, einen Internationalismus wieder herzustellen und neu zu formulieren, der ohne jeden Dualismus auskommt. Wer am verdinglichten Dualismus des Kalten Krieges festhält, läuft Gefahr, eine Politik zu treiben, die vom Standpunkt menschlicher Emanzipation, vom Standpunkt des »Kommunismus« aus, bestenfalls fragwürdig wäre, wie viele Menschen sie auch ansprechen mag."

- Moishe Postone "Geschichte und Ohnmacht" (2005)

Eine moderierte Podiumsdiskussion über Fragen des globalen Kapitals, Imperialismus und Krieg, die Möglichkeiten für progressive politische Opposition und die Probleme und Aufgaben einer Linken in einer Welt nach dem "Kalten Krieg" und nach "9/11", wie sie durch die Invasion und Besetzung von Afghanistan und Irak und den militärischen Interventionen in Libyen, Jemen und Syrien gestellt wurden.

 

Mit:

Manfred Dahlmann (Ca ira, sans phrase)
Matthias (Gruppe Arbeitermacht, Liga fĂĽr die 5. Internationale)
Jan Schröder (Platypus)

Zeit: 16.06.2016 // 18.00 - 21.00 Uhr

Ort: Festsaal, Studierendenhaus Campus Bockenheim, Frankfurt am Main

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/1032915593412226/

Juan Roch (Podemos)
Jens Wissel (Assoziation fĂĽr Kritische Gesellschaftsforschung)
Martin Suchanek (GAM/LFI)
Nikos Nikisianis (DIKTIO)
Moderator: Thodoris Velissaris

A united and peaceful Europe seemed to be a distant dream for a generation which went through the experience of war and destruction. Today, this hope gained shape in the new realities of the European Union. Despite its official proclamation of peace, social well being and an “alternative to capitalism and communism” the project finds itself in a prolonged crisis with uncertain expectations. The Euro-­crisis, massive austerity and the increasing interference into democratic principles, a growing division between powerful and weak economies, Germany's new hegemony and the growing influence of financial capital appear in stark contrast to the official slogans of “European values and solidarity”.
The desperate struggle of SYRIZA demonstrated the necessity and seeming impossibility of the Left across Europe to answer with a politics that would be truly international and go beyond “resisting austerity.” Despite growing social unrest, the deep ambivalence towards the EU expresses itself in the inability of the Left to formulate a coherent vision of a political alternative. At the same time the rejection of the EU is ceded to a growing Right. What is the EU for the Left today? Should it be overcome on the basis of the EU itself, or against the EU? The clarification of its nature and appropriate responses seem to be one of the most pressing issues for the Left on the continent and beyond.

Cornelia Möser (HU Berlin)
Joy McReady (LFI)
Lucy Parker (Platypus Affiliated Society)
Ursula Jensen 
(IBT)

Moderator: Hannah Schroeder

A namesake of Juliet Mitchell’s 1966 essay, this panel will explore the long history of the struggle for women’s liberation from the vantage point of the Left today. Mitchell critiques bourgeois feminist demands such as the right to work and equal pay to posit the need instead for equal work. She calls for a politics capable of taking on the fundamental transformation of society and more immediate demands “in a single critique of the whole of women’s situation.” In keeping with the spirit of this essay, we ask again what the relationship might be between the struggle for social emancipation and the particular tasks of feminism? How have Leftists imagined this relationship historically? What do we make of it today?

While the “woman question” has played an important role in the history of the Left, its knee-jerk inclusion in current Leftist politics does not necessarily reflect a greater understanding of what the struggle for women’s liberation might mean politically. How exactly is it “the longest revolution?” When did it begin? If the crisis of bourgeois society in the industrial revolution posed the need for women’s freedom as inseparable from the project of human emancipation, then what do we make of the later separation of the feminist movement from the workers’ movement for socialism? In the beginning of the 20th Century the woman's movement seems to demand unitary for political and legal rights, although the bourgeois feminist movement and the socialist woman's movement where distinctly opposed in their political perspective. Is the relevance of the conflict gone all together with a further perspective of the woman's question in Socialism? What do the seeming successes of feminism tell us when thought in relation to the failure of the proletarian struggle to deepen/realize the task of human freedom?