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  • Platypus Review #104 is out!
    Issue #104 of the Platypus Review is now online. This issue features Tina Sanders on the Women's March and women's rights and a transcript of the panel discussion on 1917 at UIC, featuring Sam Brown, Jonathan W. Daly, Franklin Dmitryev, and Greg Lucero.
  • Marxism in the Age of Trump - new book!
    Trump’s victory is the beginning not the end of a process of transforming the Republican Party as well as mainstream politics more generally that is his avowed goal. So the question is the transformation of democracy—of how liberal democratic politics is conducted. This was bound to change, with or without Trump. Now, with Trump, the issue is posed point-blank. There’s no avoiding the crisis of neoliberalism.

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“WE CAN DISAGREE AND STILL LOVE EACH OTHER, unless your disagreement is rooted in my oppression and denial of my humanity and right to exist,” Linda Sarsour proudly announces on her Twitter account. Sarsour is a self-proclaimed human rights activist and supporter of the anti-Semitic Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS) movement. She and her Women’s March (WM) colleagues were named Women of The Year 2017 by Glamour magazine. However, for Sarsour, Trump’s so-called “white supremacy” seems to be the only phenomenon deserving of the term “oppression.”
On November 6, 2017, the Platypus Affiliated Society held a panel discussion at the University of Illinois at Chicago on the 100th anniversary of the October Revolution. The speakers were Jonathan W. Daly (Professor of History at UIC and author of The Watchful State: Security Police and Opposition in Russia, 1906-1917), Franklin Dimitryev (News & Letters), Greg Lucero (Socialist Party USA), and Sam Brown (Black Rose/Rosa Negra). The speakers were asked to respond to the following questions: What were the aims of the 1917 Russian Revolution? What was the self-understanding of its Marxist leadership? How has the memory of 1917 changed in the course of the 20th century? Why does the legacy of 1917 appear arrayed in oppositions? Are we still tasked by the memory of 1917 today and, if so, how? The discussion was moderated by Gregor Baszak of Platypus.

Bini Adamczaks neu erschienenes Buch Der schönste Tag im Leben des Alexander Berkman. Vom möglichen Gelingen der Russischen Revolution nimmt sich ihrer Geschichte an, um die potentiellen, aber nicht realisierten Möglichkeiten des historischen Moments erfahrbar zu machen. Mit der freundlichen Zustimmung des edition assamblage Verlags sowie Adamczak selbst kann hier ein kleiner Auszug aus dem Kapitel

Zum 100. Jubiläum der Russischen Revolution von 1917 veranstaltete Platypus am 03. November 2017 eine Podiumsdiskussion in Frankfurt mit Frank Ruda (Philosoph), Lars Quadfasel (Hamburger Studienbibliothek), Anton Stortchilov (Die LINKE) und Rafael Rehm (Der Funke).