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You are here: The Platypus Affiliated Society/Archive for category 2010

A talk given by Platypus member Chris Cutrone at Loyola University, on April 21st, 2010.

The German Marxist critical theorist Theodor W. Adorno (1903-69) is known, along with his friend and mentor Walter Benjamin, for the critique of mid-20th century art and culture. What is less well understood is the specific character of Adorno's Marxism, how his political perspective related to his philosophical concerns. This workshop will address several aspects of Adorno's Marxism that relate to his critique of Leftist politics, in both periods of his early and late life, in the Old Left (1920s-40s) and New Left (1960s), and how Adorno remains relevant to issues and problems of Leftist politics today.

Recommended background readings:

Max Horkheimer, "The Little Man and the Philosophy of Freedom" (1926)

Adorno, "Imaginative Excesses" (1944)

Adorno, "Marginalia to Theory and Praxis" (1969)

Adorno, "Resignation" (1969)

Adorno and Herbert Marcuse, correspondence on the German New Left (1969)

Cosponsored by Pi Sigma Tau, STAND, and SAF.

Transcript in Platypus Review #37:

What can contemporary artists do? The question is a vague and obvious one, but remains unanswered amidst the splintering profusion of ideals and artistic practices. Has the recent infinitude of socially conscious art been liberating, or has it been constrictive? Do artists hope to regain the dissipating public, or withdraw from it? Do artists resist the culture industry which encroaches upon it and devise alternate utopia's, or liquidate into it and bring about change from within popular culture? What is at stake with artist collectives - singular isolation, or global revolution? Has postmodern and contemporary art moved beyond modernism, or has there been regression to pre-modernity? Most importantly, what purchase does art have on the present moment for augmenting change on a broader political level?
Three panelists working at the intersection of art and politics will attempt to answer these, and other questions from different perspectives - as historians, practitioners, and theorists. We hope that this conversation will aid in understanding the bewildering present by uncovering the implicit hopes of contemporary art.

Tuesday, April 27, 2010

6:00pm - 9:00pm

280 S Columbus Dr.

Chicago, IL 60603

Featuring:
Claire Pentecost (artist, writer, SAIC)
Chris Cutrone (Critic, Platypus, SAIC, U. Chicago)
Stephen Eisenman (Art History, Northwestern)

www.platypus1917.org
http://platypus1917.org/2010/04/08/an-interview-with-hal-foster/

The Platypus Affiliated Society at Loyola University present...
Adorno’s political relevance toda
When: Wednesday, April 21, 2010. 7-8:30pm.
Where: Loyola University - Crown Center Room 530.

The German Marxist critical theorist Theodor W. Adorno (1903-69) is known, along with his friend and mentor Walter Benjamin, for the critique of mid-20th century art and culture. What is less well understood is the specific character of Adorno’s Marxism, how his political perspective related to his philosophical concerns. This workshop will address several aspects of Adorno’s Marxism that relate to his critique of Leftist politics, in both periods of his early and late life, in the Old Left (1920s-40s) and New Left (1960s), and how Adorno remains relevant to issues and problems of Leftist politics today.

Recommended background readings:

Max Horkheimer, “The Little Man and the Philosophy of Freedom” (1926)

Adorno, “Imaginative Excesses” (1944)

Adorno, â€śMarginalia to Theory and Praxis” (1969)

Adorno, “Resignation” (1969)

Adorno and Herbert Marcuse, correspondence on the German New Left (1969)

Cosponsored by Pi Sigma Tau, STAND, and SAF.

On February 23, Platypus hosted an event entitled Which Way Forward for Palestinian Liberation? in which Joel Kovel, author of Overcoming Zionism and frequent commentator on the Israel-Palestine conflict, and Hussein Ibish, political analyst and senior fellow at The American Task Force on Palestine, answered questions posed by Richard Rubin of Platypus. An audience question and answer session followed. Below is an edited transcript of the event.

Date:
Wednesday, April 28, 2010
Time:
7:00pm - 9:30pm
Location:
Wollman Hall, The New School
Street:
65 W 11th street, 5th floor (please enter through 66th w. 12th st.)
   
Please join Platypus in a panel discussion between artists and cultural theorists at the New School. Doors open at 6:30pm, panel begins at 7:00pm.
 
Following the discussion, there will a Q&A session with the audience.

In an age of global capitalism, "progressive" art is generally conceived of as a political form of resistance to capitalism's all-encompassing presence and commodification of culture. Taking the form of public stunts, political pranks, "dematerialized" experiences, and community engagements, many works seek to rupture the texture of our everyday lives and offer alternative models for politics and society. But given that, in our current moment, the Left has little to no capacity to shape our social and political direction, the merits and effectiveness of art as a form of resistance must be thrown into question. Can art really have a stake in making political change? If so, has contemporary art been at all successful in doing so? How must art's relationship to politics be understood, and what must be rethought in light of our present? Bringing together practicing artists and critical theorists, this panel raises these questions in order to increase the potential to shape our socio-political and artistic future.

Coco Fusco (Artist, Writer and Associate Prof. at Parsons )
Andrea Geyer (Artist and Professor at Parsons)
Jim Miller (Chair of Lib. Stu. and Professor of Poli. Sci. at the NSSR)
Haseeb Ahmed (Platypus Affiliated Society)
moderated by Chris Mansour (Platypus)

Event Sponsored By:
The Platypus Affiliated Society
NSSR Philosophy Department
NSSR Liberal Studies Department
NSSR Department of Politics
NSGS Media Studies Department
Parsons Fine Arts Department

If you have any questions, please contact Chris Mansour at chris.d.mansour@gmail.com

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