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Towards a Newer Avant-Garde presents: "To a Woman Passing By"

Inaugural Exhibition 

@ Obst, 1801 s Peoria 

Reception
Friday, September 21st, 2018 (Obst, 1801 s Peoria)


To a woman passing by,

I have watched you on the street, placing foot in front of foot, darting through the mass of God’s hellish creation. I have been irreparably struck by your image, which is always departing from my view. With the abandon of your steps, you have won my admiration. I love you for your grace because your walk is so unloving and your movement so unending. I love you for your presence because your sight vaporizes and your gaze unnerves.I love you for the indifferences you cast and the interest you represent. I love you for your taste because it ruthlessly discards whatever cannot last, for you have shown me that the ever-new remains the same old thing. But most of all, I love the cloudy dreams your profanity inspires. Your’s is a rejuvenating sight, and for that I dedicate these works, my first efforts in your name.

The softness that fascinates, the pleasure that kills! 

I may be an incomplete man, but I am very passionate.


 

Exhibiting Artists |
Tatyana Skalany, Anthony Gonzalez, Wesley Gryziak, Suzy Vogenthal, Ant Morales, Anthora Guarderas, Patrick Zapien, Erin Hagood, Stephanie Gomez

 

Wesley Gryziak, "Two Trees at the Bottom of a Hill", 2017

Anthora Guarderas, "pass me by mr. lurk", 2018

Tatyana Skalany,
Untitled 2, 2018

Tatyana Skalany,
Untitled, 2018

Patrick Zapien, "Three Shades (After Rodin)", 2018

Ant Morales, "Reverie of Looking Left", 2013

Ant Morales, "6refinery.nine", 2018

Group show Entrance @ Obst

Group Show Exit @ Obst

Erin Hagood, Patrick Zapien, Stephanie Gomez & Suzy Vogenthaler, insert by Wesley Gryziak

"To A Woman Passing By"

 Electronic Copy

(Contact our facebook for inquiry on how to acquire hard copy)

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On March 3, 2017, Jensen Suther interviewed Jay Bernstein, who teaches philosophy at the New School. Bernstein is the author of a number of books on art, ethics, and Critical Theory, which include The Fate of Art: Aesthetic Alienation from Kant to Derrida and Adorno (1992), Adorno: Disenchantment and Ethics (2006), Against Voluptuous Bodies: Adorno’s Late Modernism and the Meaning of Painting (2007), and most recently, Torture and Dignity: An Essay on Moral Injury (2016). What follows is an edited version of the interview.
On October 11, 2016, Platypus hosted a forum entitled “Art and the Commodity Form” at Goldsmiths, University of London. The panel brought together Rex Dunn, independent Marxist and writer; Zhoe Granger, a director of the gallery, project space, and art publisher, Arcadia Missa; and Peter Osborne, editor of the journal Radical Philosophy and professor of Modern European Philosophy at Kingston University. Sophia Freeman of Platypus moderated the panel. What follows is an edited transcript of the event.
Famously, Clement Greenberg wrote in 1939 that the avant-garde is connected to the bourgeoisie by an “umbilical cord of gold.” This image has become so familiar that its peculiarities are rarely commented upon. The point is not simply the obvious one for Marxists, that art reflects the interests of a bourgeois class.

One of four panels held by the Platypus Affiliated Society at Left Forum 2014, from May 30th to June 1st, 2014.

Although the art world seemed mostly unscathed by the 2008 financial crisis and the Occupy movement, a notable focus on the art market and the power structures of the art world has emerged in the past few years. This trend has been visible in gallery and museum shows, which have taken on a more introspective, historical character and largely shied away from the overblown spectacle of years past, and in numerous articles in various media outlets, from niche blogs to the New York Times. Moreover, the language of the art world, from gallery or museum press releases and catalogs to reviews to lengthy theoretical articles, has long been steeped in Marxist cultural critique, although this influence mostly remains implicit, unstated, and perhaps unconscious. Ben Davis’s recent book, 9.5 Theses on Art and Class, arrived as something of an anomaly in this atmosphere. A welcome anomaly, though, and one worth exploring further. What does a Marxist approach to contemporary art look like, separate from merely a critique of the art market or a preference for overtly “political” art? Davis and others have suggested that art’s true power lies in the utopian image of the figure of the artist, who embodies personally fulfilling labor, rather than art as such. This begs the fundamental question: what is the role of art itself in the contemporary landscape, and can this be separated from the structures (institutional and financial) in which it is embedded?

Chair:
Robin Treadwell

Speakers:
Bret Schneider (Platypus)
Saul Ostrow (Critical Practices Inc.)
Mike Pepi
Oxana Timofeeva (Chto delat?/What is to be done?)