RSS FeedRSS FeedLivestreamLivestreamVimeoVimeoTwitterTwitterFacebook GroupFacebook Group
You are here: Platypus /Archive for category Issue # 7

Benjamin Blumberg, Ian Morrison

Platypus Review 7 | October 2008

[PDF]

In March 2003, millions took to the streets worldwide to protest the impending invasion of Iraq. Despite their numbers, the efforts proved in vain. The war went on; the protests dwindled. But however attenuated, there are still protests. In Minneapolis/St. Paul this August, some 10,000 marched against the Republican National Convention. But as organized rallies gave way to irrational violence, the inadequacy of five years of failed Anti-War activism and Left opposition came into sharp relief.

Most of the confrontations amounted to simple, momentary blockages of traffic. By all accounts, the police grossly overreacted: harassing journalists, brutalizing protestors, arresting the innocent. But more fringe elements in activist culture were also on display. Some hurled bricks through the window of a bus transporting delegates; others sprayed delegates with unknown irritants. These actions may seem excessive and irrational, beyond the objectives and attitudes of the wider movement. But their deeper motivations lies within the mainstream of activist culture today.

The helplessness of the anti-war movement has turned the Left’s disappointments and frustrations into pathology. Energy is directed, not towards revolutionary change, but against social integration. For college-aged youth this means the transition from parental authority to working life. The anxiety and fear built up around this process of socialization creates a political imagination directed at forming ruptures and breaking points in society — everything, from organizational meetings to attending protests, centers on creating a wall of resistance against one’s own inevitable absorption into society.

As seasoned anti-war activist Alexander Cockburn pointed out last year, “an anti-war rally has to be edgy, not comfortable. Emotions should be high, nerves at least a bit raw, anger tinged with fear.” (“Whatever Happened to the Anti-War Movement?” New Left Review, July-August 2007). Such emotionalism points to the way present forms of helplessness have been naturalized into one of the anti-war movement’s core assumptions, turning trepidation into a political program.

Naturalizing helplessness, today’s protesters celebrate simple altercations with the police as victories. Violence seems to cleanse the individual of their ‘bourgeois’ conformity. Attending a protest means breaking with the decadence of consumer society, creating a ‘prefigurative’ space, trying to ‘create the new world in the palm of the old.’ Each blow of the truncheon dramatizes the difference between protestor and police. The rougher the conflict, the more the protestor feels free from the burden of society.

Yet, young protesters only elicit a police beating in order to sensationalize their own submission to authority. And, ironically, this is coupled with a clear awareness that the tactics employed are utterly inadequate in addressing the issues these protests propose to be fighting. In the age of Predator drones, blocking a highway will not stop American military might.

The Left’s helplessness, on full display in Minneapolis, has eroded the very function of protest. Once, protest demonstrated the vitality and relevancy of the demand for social transformation. Thousands in the streets could not be ignored. But protest has devolved into an insular subculture of self-hatred, frustration, and anxiety derived from a pathological attitude towards social integration. Activists who equate social domination with their experience with tear gas, tazers and rubber bullets block the development of a more serious and effective Leftist politics. |P

Liam Warfield

Platypus Review 7 | October 2008

[PDF]

The crowd assembled in a shady corner of Grant Park in the waning afternoon hours of August 28 might have been mistaken for extras in a poorly-funded period film. With clothes loosely evoking 60’s-era protest, they reclined in the grass, rolling cigarettes, eating peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwiches, listening to speeches and gazing at the sky. It might have seemed a stretch to bill the event as a historical reenactment of the notorious 1968 Democratic National Convention protests — that long and bloody week in Chicago which has been discussed and picked over at length in this 40th anniversary year. The emblems of Chicago ’68 — wild-eyed police officers with nightsticks — were nowhere to be seen. Grant Park on that afternoon was more concerned with the action around the campfire than the savagery on the battlefield.

It might seem purely semantic that we insisted on considering the event a historical reenactment rather than a commemoration or a bit of theater, but for us this was an important distinction. As a group of young, largely inexperienced activists it was the only organizing framework we could find which emphasized active participation. Other forms seemed linguistically and ideologically flaccid; of course we could observe the anniversary, as people had been doing all summer, but this implied an insufficient (and appalling) detachment from the subject. We didn’t want to view our history—our radical history—as if from a riverbank, we wanted to jump in and splash around in it.

The reenactment of the 1968 Chicago DNC protests would be a curious project, difficult to plan, the shape of it abnormal and constantly shifting. Our purpose seemed perfectly obvious at times, entirely digestible—a historical reenactment of the ’68 DNC protests, that’s all—but at other times it seemed to bulge surrealistically in a thousand directions. Would we aim for some degree of historical accuracy, or would anything fly? We debated, for instance, the ethics of nominating a live pig for the presidency: what should we feed it, and where would it stay? Which would we feed the masses of reenactors, potato or pasta salad? And in the event of trouble with the police, what, among a stunning array of possible tactics, might prove our wisest course of action? We plotted and planned over the summer to the point of exhaustion; the minutiae multiplied endlessly. And yet, when pressed as to why we were attempting such a thing, we had no ready answer. It was soundbite-resistant, experimental, it called for deep breaths and meandering explanations.

Clearly this history had not yet been codified. It continued to elicit a variety of interpretations. A recent addition to the collection of books on ’68, Frank Kusch’s Battleground Chicago, attempted a cop's-eye view of the week’s event; academics and historians continued to tackle the subject from disparate angles, trying to come to grips with this jarring moment in modern American history when power and resistance grappled so publicly and with so much violence and fanfare. Our subject matter still was squirming, making it impossible to predict what shape a reenactment might take. We estimated an attendance of anywhere from 100 to 10,000 people—who could say how many Chicagoans knew or cared enough about the ‘68 convention to devote a day in the park to its exploration?—and we applied rather blindly for a permit from the Park District, treading lightly through their downtown office as if in an enemy lair; we contemplated a range of possible police responses, from utter indifference to full-scale riot. We solicited the advice of everyone from ‘60s-era activist-professors like Abe Peck and Bernadine Dohrn to freakniks like Ed Sanders, though few of these aging lions had much to offer beyond bemused encouragement.

What few of us predicted, in the midst of our fretting, was the cool and contemplative afternoon which ultimately unfolded. A small detail of bike police, having preemptively barricaded the iconic Logan statue from a possible storming, relaxed on the far periphery as local authors, filmmakers, activists and historians chewed over the meaning of the ‘68 convention’s legacy, and performers exhumed the ghosts of the DNC’s radical celebrity class, from Phil Ochs and the MC5 to Bobby Seale and Allen Ginsberg. I found myself delivering a surprisingly mild-tempered speech which called for the metaphorical sharing of blankets. Occasional pot fumes wafted across the crowd, no mere prop, and by twilight, after several hours of speech-making and folksinging, the ritual of mass meditation seemed almost capable of releasing us from the weight of this history. This release was something of an illusion, of course. The following week, protesters at the Republican National Convention in St. Paul were being tear-gassed and arrested by the hundreds, their homes and gathering places raided by teams from the Department of Homeland Security. The historic echoes were inevitable and maddening, the old Pstalemate so clearly still at work. It was difficult to reconcile what we’d accomplished — little more or less than a beautiful and thought-provoking afternoon in the park — with the ugly echoes of ‘68 emanating from the Twin Cities. If our reenactment, unpermitted and inherently anti-authoritarian, was a modest exercise in discovering what we could get away with in the public sphere, news from St. Paul came as a stern reminder of what we couldn’t get away with. A shady corner of Grant Park on a late-summer evening, they’d give us that, but to agitate outside of an actual political convention, with all of those television cameras on hand, would prove as unfeasible in 2008 as it was 40 years ago. Protesters in St. Paul were being summarily tear-gassed and jailed en masse, held (unconstitutionally) for the duration of the convention week to preclude further disruption. It was sobering to speculate that law enforcement might have learned more about stifling dissent, over the last 40 years, than demonstrators had learned about cultivating it.

We were asked several times, in the course of planning the event, whether it might lead to similar historical reenactments in the future. It was an understandable question to be asked by journalists, but it misses the point. The last thing we wanted, though we had a curious way of showing it, was to lose ourselves in yesterday’s near-revolutionary moments, to fetishize or serialize them for their own sake. We were more interested in comprehending their shortcomings; the fact that the ‘68 convention was followed shortly by the election of Richard Nixon and a marked increase in political repression served as a prominent footnote to our idyll in the park. The clear view of history which we were striving for would not illuminate, of its own accord, any paths forward. It might, we hoped, foster meaningful dialogue. |P

Pam C. Nogales C., Benjamin Shepard

Platypus Review 7 | October 2008

[PDF]

An interview with SDS member Rachel Haut published in the September issue of this publication provoked widespread comment in radical circles.[1] We welcome the discussion but worry that it remains ensconced within the sterile jargon and petty antinomies of the actually-existing- Left. More fundamental questions exist than, say, the position of sectarian groups within the SDS -- questions that unsettle the comfortable assumptions of radical politics. There’s a temptation to think such of questioning as an irrelevant, academic obstruction to real action. Indeed, most contemporary radical theory confuses more than clarifies. But confused political thinking leads to confused politics and confused politics mean failed politics. Here are five questions that point towards the roots of confusion. We don’t have firm answers to any of them. They trouble us, and occupy our thoughts and conversations.

1. What is Capitalism, and how can it be overcome? The SDS aims to “change a society which depends upon multiple and reciprocal systems of oppression and domination for its survival: racism and white supremacy, capitalism, patriarchy, heterosexism and transphobia, authoritarianism and imperialism, among others.” These systems, with a single exception, are simple forms of domination. A ruling stratum (whites, men) oppresses a given subaltern. Capitalism seems much more complicated; impossible to reduce to the direct and violent oppression of one class by another. How ought the student movement understand the characteristic form of capitalist domination? And what forms of politics are adequate to overcome it?

2. SDS is against imperialism; what is it for?Many anti-imperialists insist that ending American global domination would open the opportunity for revolutionary forces across the world. But such an argument does not specify the possible agents of social transformation. Worse, the position ignores the possibility of reactionary domestic politics. If the United States withdrew from Iraq and Afghanistan, more reactionary forces -- Muslim theocracy, corrupt nationalism -- could easily take its place. In the absence of a real international progressive movement, the choice will always between bad and worse. How, then, can the (American) student movement help cultivate emancipatory politics around the globe?

3. How does racism matter? The Civil Rights movement eliminated de jure discrimination, and rendered public bigotry unacceptable. But racial inequalities still exist. African Americans have, for instance, a disproportionately high rate of incarceration. Radicals cite such discrepancies as evidence of the continued force of racism. But stressing race risks glossing over the structural, class-bound constitution of poverty. If contemporary American society is, in fact, racist, what is the specific form of this racism? How does this racism relate to the broader social structure of the United States? What political and social changes would render racism, and the very concepts of race that it depends upon, irrelevant?

4. What kind of questions can students ask? Members of SDS often disavow their distinctive identity as students, feeling it an unwarranted and embarrassing privilege. But student life presents unique opportunities -- to read, to discuss, to examine and critique different traditions of politics. But SDS does not, as a whole, take up the opportunity. Fear of sectarian controversy precludes sustained ideological discussion, so the orientation and form of the organization remains unquestioned and uncertain. Serious, honest reflection and conversation can clarify these uncertainties. So, what sort of fundamental questions ought the SDS ask itself and the broader Left? How can it ask them?

5. Why, and how, could the New SDS succeed where the old did not? The Port Huron statement sought to “replace power rooted in possession, privilege, or circumstance by power and uniqueness rooted in love, reflectiveness, reason, and creativity...” The first SDS failed to meet its own task. Possession, privilege and circumstance still determine social power. So why did the Old SDS fail? And how can the new one succeed? The problem is broader, though. With the passing of the 60s moment, whatever (slim) possibility of international revolutionary change there was has evaporated. No organized political force offers the practical possibility of a qualitatively better future for all humanity. How ought we understand the loss of political possibility? What would make international revolutionary politics possible again? What role might SDS, as a movement in the U.S., at the heart of global capitalism, play in such a process? |P


[1]. See: Freedom Road Socialist Organization (www.frso.org), Kasama blog (mikeely.wordpress.com), The Daily Radical blog (www.dailyradical.org), Louis Proyect blog (louisproyect.wordpress.com), Revolutionary Left blog (www.revleft.com), Marxist-Leninist blog (marxistleninist.wordpress.com), and Left Spot blog (http://leftspot.com/blog).

The Platypus Historians Group

Platypus Review 7 | October 2008

[PDF]

WITH THE PRESENT FINANCIAL MELT-DOWN in the U.S. throwing the global economy into question, many on the “Left” are wondering again about the nature of capitalism. While many will be tempted to jump on the bandwagon of the “bailout” being floated by the Bush administration and the Congressional Democrats (including Obama), others will protest the “bailing out” of Wall Street.

The rhetoric of “Wall Street vs. Main Street,” between “hardworking America” and the “financial fat cats,” however, belies a more fundamental truth: the two are indissolubly linked and are in fact two sides of the same coin of capitalism.

It would be no less reactionary — that is, conservative of capitalism — to try to oppose “productive” industrial manufacturing or service sector capitalism to “parasitic” financial capitalism.

As Georg Lukács pointed out in his seminal essay “Reification and the Consciousness of the Proletariat” (1923), following Marx’s critique of “alienation” (in Capital, 1867) (and echoing the at-the-time yet-to-be discovered writings by Marx such as the 1844 Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts and the Grundrisse, 1858), modern society structured by the dynamic domination of capital gives rise to “necessary forms of appearance” that are symptomatic of capital.

These reified “forms of appearance” include not only forms of “exchange” such as monetary and financial systems, but also, more fundamentally, forms of wage labor and concrete forms of production, which are just as much a part of capital’s reproduction as a social system as are any conventions of exchange.

This means that one cannot oppose one side of capital to another, one cannot side with “productive labor” against “parasitic capital” without being one-sided and falling into a trap of advocating and participating in the reproduction of capital at a deeper level. Lukács recognized, following Marx, that capital is not merely a form of “economics” but a social system of (re)production.

But most varieties of “Marxism” have missed this very crucial point, and so take Marx to mean rather the opposite, that industrial production embodies what is true and good about capital, while exchange and money represents what is false and bad about it. Such pseudo-”Marxism” has falsely (and conservatively) vilified the supposedly “fictitious” nature of “finance capital.”

Following Marx, Lukács, through his concept of “reification,” sought to deepen the critical recognition of the social-historical problem of capital, to recognize that modern society as structured and dominated by capital exhibits specific symptoms of this domination. Such symptoms are the attempts by human beings individually and collectively to master, control and adjudicate the effects of the social dynamism that capital sets in motion.

However, in Marx’s phrase (from the 1848 Manifesto of the Communist Party), the dynamic of capital ensures that “all that is solid melts into air.” The modern society of capital is one in which all concrete ways of life, social organization and production, are subject to revolutionization through a cycle of “creative destruction.” But Marx did not simply bemoan this dynamism of capital that ends up making transient all human endeavors, mocking their futility.

Rather, Marx recognized this dynamism as an “alienated” form of social freedom. The creative destruction engendered by capital is the way capital reproduces its social logic, but it also gives rise to transformations of concrete ways of social life the world has never before seen, engendering new possibilities for humanity—the past 200 years of capitalism have seen more, and more profound changes, globally, than previous millennia saw. Unfortunately, the reproduction of capital also means undermining such new human potentialities (for instance, new forms of gender and sexual relations) as soon as they are brought onto the ever-shifting horizon of possibility.

With the current financial collapse, the temptation will be to retreat to what many on the pseudo-”Left” have long advocated, a “new New Deal” of Keynesian Fordist and welfare-state social-security reforms. The temptation on the “Left” (as well as the Right) will be to see what some have called “saving capitalism from itself” as “progress.” But such attempts to master the dynamics of capital will not only fail to achieve their aims, but will also entail unexpected further consequences and problems no less potentially destructive for humanity than so-called “free-market” practices of capitalism.

If the neo-Keynesians as well as others, such as the more radical “socialists” on the “Left” are mistaken in their hopes for reformist solutions to the problems of capital, it is not least because they don’t recognize capitalism as a (alienated) form of (increasing the scope of) freedom. Rather, their nemeses among the “neo-liberals” such as Milton Friedman (in the 1962 book Capitalism and Freedom) and Friedrich Hayek (in his 1943 book The Road to Serfdom) have given expression to this liberal dimension of capital, which they opposed to what they took to be the worse authoritarianism of (nationalist) socialism.

Opposed to this have been thinkers such as Karl Polanyi (The Great Transformation, 1944) and John Kenneth Galbraith (The Affluent Society, 1958, which warned of the effects of private-sector capital outstripping the public sector). Polanyi, for instance, complained that capitalism commodified three things that supposedly cannot be commodities, labor, land and money itself. In such a one-sided opposition to capital, Polanyi neglected to realize that what makes modern society what it is, what distinguishes modern capitalism from earlier pre-modern forms of capital, is that it precisely entails subjecting these supposedly not “commodifiable” things to the commodity form. Modern capital is precisely about the radical revolutionizing of how we relate to forms of social intercourse, labor, and nature.

So no one should be fooled into thinking that supposedly better forms of politically managing (e.g., under the Democrats) the social investment in, and thus preserving the “value” and promoting the improvement of material production, infrastructure, or forms of knowledge represents any kind of sure “progress.”—No one should mistake for even a moment that such efforts will not be a windfall and lining the pockets of the capitalists (on “Main Street”) through upward income-redistribution schemes any less than “bailing out” Wall Street will be.

The presently bemoaned deregulation of financial institutions that occurred under Bill Clinton in the 1990s was not meant (merely) to enrich the rich further, but to open the way for new forms of economic and social relations, both locally and globally. Such “neo-liberal” reforms were meant to overcome, in Milton Friedman’s phrase, the “tyranny of the status quo”—a sentiment any emancipatory Left ought not to regard with excessive cynicism. For the neo-liberals found a hearing not only among the wealthy, but also among many left out of the prior Keynesian/Fordist arrangements—see, for instance, the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus’s social activist work in “microfinance” in Bangladesh.

A Marxian approach to the problem of capital, as Lukács warned with his concept of “reification,” recognizes that “labor” and its forms of “production” are no less “reified” and “ideological” in their practices under capital, no less “unreal” and subject to de-realization, with destructive social consequences, than are the forms of “exchange,” monetization and finance.

An authentically Marxian Left should take no side in the present debates over the merits and pitfalls of the “bailout” of the financial system. One can and should critique this, of course, but nonetheless remain aware that this is no simple matter of opposing it. This side of revolutionary emancipation beyond capital, a Marxian politics would demand to better finance capital no less than to support labor. Finance capital is no less legitimate if also no less symptomatic of capital than any other phenomenon of modern life. So it deserves not to be vilified or denounced but understood as a way humanity has tried authentically to cope with the creative destruction of capital in modern social life. |P

Chris Cutrone

Platypus Review 7 | October 2008

[PDF]

[Español] [Ελληνικό] [Deutsch]

The following is a talk given at the Marxist-Humanist Committee public forum on The Crisis in Marxist Thought, hosted by the Platypus Affiliated Society in Chicago on Friday, July 25, 2008.

I want to speak about the meaning of history for any purportedly Marxian Left.

We in Platypus focus on the history of the Left because we think that the narrative one tells about this history is in fact one’s theory of the present. Implicitly or explicitly, in one’s conception of the history of the Left, is an account of how the present came to be. By focusing on the history of the Left, or, by adopting a Left-centric view of history, we hypothesize that the most important determinations of the present are the result of what the Left has done or failed to do historically.

For the purposes of this talk, I will focus on the broadest possible framing for such questions and problems of capital in history, the broadest possible context within which I think one needs to understand the problems faced by the Left, specifically by a purportedly Marxian Left.

I will not, for example, be focusing so much on issues for Platypus in the history of the various phases and stages of capital itself, for instance our contention that the 1960s represented not any kind of advance, but a profound retrogression on the Left. I will not elucidate our account of how the present suffers from at least 3 generations of degeneration and regression on the Left: the first, in the 1930s, being tragic; the second in the 1960s being farcical; and the most recent, in the 1990s, being sterilizing.

But, suffice it to say, I will point out that, for Platypus, the recognition of regression and the attempt to understand its significance and causes is perhaps our most important point of departure. The topic of this talk is the most fundamental assumption informing our understanding of regression.

For purposes of brevity, I will not be citing explicitly, but I wish to indicate my indebtedness for the following treatment of a potential Marxian philosophy of history, beyond Marx and Engels themselves, and Rosa Luxemburg, Lenin and Trotsky, to Georg Lukács, Karl Korsch, Walter Benjamin, Theodor Adorno, and, last but not least, the Marx scholar Moishe Postone. And, moreover, I will be in dialogue, through these writers, with Hegel, who distinguished philosophical history as the story of the development of freedom.—For Hegel, history is only meaningful the degree to which it is the story of freedom.

Capital is completely unprecedented in the history of humanity, hence, any struggle for emancipation beyond capital is also completely unprecedented. While there is a connection between the unprecedented nature of the emergence of capital in history and the struggle to get beyond it, this connection can also be highly misleading, leading to a false symmetry between the transition into and within different periods of the transformations of modern capital, and a potential transition beyond capital. The revolt of the Third Estate, which initiated a still on-going and never-to-be-exhausted modern history of bourgeois-democratic revolutions, is both the ground for, and, from a Marxian perspective, the now potentially historically obsolescent social form of politics from which proletarian socialist politics seeks to depart, to get beyond.

Hegel, as a philosopher of the time of the last of the great bourgeois-democratic revolutions marking the emergence of modern capital, the Great French Revolution of 1789, was for this reason a theorist of the revolt of the Third Estate. Marx, who came later, after the beginning of the Industrial Revolution of the 19th Century, faced problems Hegel did not.

It has often been stated, but not fully comprehended by Marxists that Marx recognized the historical mission of the class-conscious proletariat, to overcome capitalism and to thus do away with class society. Traditionally, this meant, however paradoxically, either the end of the pre-history or the beginning of the true history of humanity.—In a sense, this duality of the possibility of an end and a true beginning, was a response to a Right Hegelian notion of an end to history, what is assumed by apologists for capital as a best of all possible worlds.

Famously, in the Communist Manifesto, Marx and Engels stated that all history hitherto has been the history of class struggles; Engels added a clever footnote later that specified “all written history.” We might extrapolate from this that what Engels meant was the history of civilization; history as class struggle did not pertain, for instance, to human history or social life prior to the formation of classes, the time of the supposed “primitive communism.” Later, in 1942 (in “Reflections on Class Theory”), Adorno, following Benjamin (in the “Theses on the Philosophy of History,” 1940), wrote that such a conception by Marx and Engels of all of history as the history of class struggles was in fact a critique of all of history, a critique of history itself.

So in what way does the critique of history matter in the critique of capital? The problem with the commonplace view of capitalism as primarily a problem of exploitation is that it is in this dimension that capital fails to distinguish itself from other forms of civilization. What is new in capital is social domination, which must be distinguished both logically and historically, structurally and empirically, from exploitation, to which it is not reducible. Social domination means the domination of society by capital. This is what is new about capital in the history of civilization; prior forms of civilization knew overt domination of some social groups over others, but did not know as Marx recognized in capital a social dynamic to which all social groups—all aspects of society as a whole—are subject.

So we must first draw a demarcation approximately 10,000 years ago, with the origins of civilization and class society, when the great agricultural revolution of the Neolithic Age took place, and human beings went from being nomadic hunter-gatherers to becoming settled agriculturalists. The predominant mode of life for humanity went from the hunter-gatherer to the peasant, and was this for most of subsequent history.

Several hundred years ago, however, a similarly profound transformation began, in which the predominant mode of life has gone from agricultural peasant to urban worker: wage-earner, manufacturer, and industrial producer.

More proximally, with the Industrial Revolution in the late-18th to early-19th Centuries, certain aspects of this “bourgeois” epoch of civilization and society manifested themselves and threw this history of the emergence of modernity into a new light. Rather than an “end of history” as bourgeois thinkers up to that time had thought, modern social life entered into a severe crisis that fundamentally problematized the transition from peasant- to worker-based society.

With Marx in the 19th Century came the realization that bourgeois society, along with all its categories of subjectivity including its valorization of labor, might itself be transitional, that the end-goal of humanity might not be found in the productive individual of bourgeois theory and practice, but that this society might point beyond itself, towards a potential qualitative transformation at least as profound as that which separated the peasant way of life from the urban “proletarian” one, indeed a transition more on the order of profundity of the Neolithic Revolution in agriculture that ended hunter-gatherer society 10,000 years ago, more profound than that which separated modern from traditional society.

At the same time that this modern, bourgeois society ratcheted into high gear by the late-18th Century, it entered into crisis, and a new, unprecedented historical phenomenon was manifested in political life, the “Left.” —While earlier forms of politics certainly disputed values, this was not in terms of historical “progress,” which became the hallmark of the Left.

The Industrial Revolution of the early 19th Century, the introduction of machine production, was accompanied by the optimistic and exhilarating socialist utopias suggested by these new developments, pointing to fantastical possibilities expressed in the imaginations of Fourier and Saint-Simon, among others.

Marx regarded the society of “bourgeois right” and “private property” as indeed already resting on the social constitution and mediation of labor, from which private property was derived, and asked the question of whether the trajectory of this society, from the revolt of the Third Estate and the manufacturing era in the 18th Century to the Industrial Revolution of the 19th Century, indicated the possibility of a further development.

In the midst of the dramatic social transformations of the 19th Century in which, as Marx put it in the Manifesto, “all that was solid melted into air,” as early as 1843, Marx prognosed and faced the future virtual proletarianization of society, and asked whether and how humanity in proletarian form might liberate itself from this condition, whether and how, and with what necessity the proletariat would “transcend” and “abolish itself.” As early as the 1844 Manuscripts, Marx recognized that socialism (of Proudhon et al.) was itself symptomatic of capital: proletarian labor was constitutive of capital, and thus its politics was symptomatic of how the society conditioned by capital might reveal itself as transitional, as pointing beyond itself.—This was Marx’s most fundamental point of departure, that proletarianization was a substantial social problem and not merely relative to the bourgeoisie, and that the proletarianization of society was not the overcoming of capital but its fullest realization, and that this—the proletarianized society of capital—pointed beyond itself.

Thus, with Marx, a philosophy of the history of the Left was born. For Marx was not a socialist or communist so much as a thinker who tasked himself with understanding the meaning of the emergence of proletarian socialism in history. Marx was not simply the best or most consistent or radical socialist, but rather the most historically, and hence critically, self-aware. By “scientific” socialism, Marx understood himself to be elaborating a form of knowledge aware of its own conditions of possibility.

For a Hegelian and Marxian clarification of the specificity of the modern problem of social freedom, however, it becomes clear that the Left must define itself not sociologically, whether in terms of socioeconomic class or a principle of collectivism over individualism, etc., but rather as a matter of consciousness, specifically historical consciousness.

For, starting with Marx, it is consciousness of history and historical potential and possibilities, however apparently utopian or obscure, that distinguishes the Left from the Right, not the struggle against oppression—which the modern Right also claims. The Right does not represent the past but rather the foreclosing of possibilities in the present.

For this reason, it is important for us to recognize the potential and fact of regression that the possibilities for the Left in theory and practice have suffered as a result of the abandonment of historical consciousness in favor of the immediacies of struggles against oppression.

Marx’s critique of symptomatic socialism, from Proudhon, Lassalle, Bakunin, et al., to his own followers in the new German Social-Democratic Party and their program at Gotha (as well as in Engels’s subsequent critique of the Erfurt Programme), was aimed at maintaining the Marxian vision corresponding to the horizon of possibility of post-capitalist and post-proletarian society.

Unfortunately, beginning in Marx’s own lifetime, the form of politics he sought to inspire began to fall well below the threshold of this critically important consciousness of history. And the vast majority of this regression has taken place precisely in the name of “Marxism.” Throughout the history of Marxism, from the disputes with the anarchists in the 1st International Workingmen’s Association, and disputes in the 2nd Socialist International, to the subsequent splits in the Marxist workers’ movement with the Bolshevik-led Third, Communist International and Trotskyist Fourth International, a sometimes heroic but, in retrospect, overwhelmingly tragic struggle to preserve or recover something of the initial Marxian point of departure for modern proletarian socialism took place.

In the latter half of the 20th Century, developments regressed so far behind the original Marxian self-consciousness that Marxism itself became an affirmative ideology of industrial society, and the threshold of post-capitalist society became obscured, finding expression only obtusely, in various recrudescent utopian ideologies, and, finally, in the most recent period, with the hegemony of “anarchist” ideologies and Romantic rejections of modernity.

But, beyond this crisis and passage into oblivion of a specifically Marxian approach, the “Left” itself, which emerged prior to Hegel and Marx’s attempts to philosophize its historical significance, has virtually disappeared. The present inability to distinguish conservative-reactionary from progressive-emancipatory responses to the problems of society conditioned by capital, is inseparable from the decline and disappearance of the social movement of proletarian socialism for which Marx had sought to provide a more adequate and provocative self-consciousness at the time of its emergence in the 19th Century.

Paradoxically, as Lukács, following Luxemburg and Lenin, already pointed out, almost a century ago, while the apparent possibility of overcoming capital approaches in certain respects, in another sense it seems to retreat infinitely beyond the horizon of possibility. Can we follow Luxemburg’s early recognition of the opportunism that always threatens us, not as some kind of selling-out or falling from grace, but rather the manifestation of the very real fear that attends the dawning awareness of what grave risks are entailed in trying to fundamentally move the world beyond capital?

What’s worse—and, in the present, prior to any danger of “opportunism”—with the extreme coarsening if not utter disintegration of the ability to apprehend and transform capital through working-class politics, has come the coarsening of our ability to even recognize and apprehend, let alone adequately understand our social reality. We do not suffer simply from opportunism but from a rather more basic disorientation. Today we are faced with the problem not of changing the world but more fundamentally of understanding it.

On the other hand, approaching Marxian socialism, are we dealing with a “utopia?”—And, if so, what of this? What is the significance of our “utopian” sense of human potential beyond capital and proletarian labor? Is it a mere dream?

Marx began with utopian socialism and ended with the most influential if spectacularly failing modern political ideology, “scientific socialism.” At the same time, Marx gave us an acute and incisive critical framework for grasping the reasons why the last 200 years have been, by far, the most tumultuously transformative but also destructive epoch of human civilization, why this period has promised so much and yet disappointed so bitterly. The last 200 years have seen more, and more profound changes, than prior millennia have. Marx attempted to grasp the reasons for this. Others have failed to see the difference and have tried to re-assimilate modern history back into its antecedents (for instance, in postmodernist illusions of an endless medievalism: see Bruno Latour’s 1993 book We Have Never Been Modern).

What would it mean to treat the entire Marxian project as, first and foremost, a recognition of the history of modernity tout court as one of the pathology of transition, from the class society that emerged with the agricultural revolution 10,000 years ago and the civilizations based on an essentially peasant way of life, through the emergence of the commodity form of social mediation, to the present global civilization dominated by capital, towards a form of humanity that might lie beyond this?

With Marx we are faced with a self-consciousness of an obscure and mysterious historical task, which can only be further clarified theoretically through transformative practice—the practice of proletarian socialism. But this task has been abandoned in favor of what are essentially capital-reconstituting struggles, attempting to cope with the vicissitudes of the dynamics of modern history. But this re-assimilation of Marxism back into ideology characteristic of the revolt of the Third Estate means the loss of the true horizon of possibility that motivated Marx and gave his project meaning and urgency.

Can we follow Marx and the best historically revolutionary Marxists who followed him in recognizing the forms of discontent in the pathological society we inhabit as being themselves symptomatic of and bound up with the very problem against which they rage? Can we avoid the premature post-capitalism and bad, reactionary utopianism that attends the present death of the Left in theory in practice, and preserve and fulfill the tasks given to us by history? Can we recognize the breadth and depth of the problem we seek to overcome without retreating into wishful thinking and ideological gracing of the accomplished fact, and apologizing for impulses that only seem directed against it, at the expense of what might lie beyond the traps of the suffering of the present?

We urgently need an acute awareness of our historical epoch as well as of our fleeting moment now, within it.—We must ask what it is about the present moment that might make the possibility of recovering a Marxian social and political consciousness viable, and how we can advance it by way of recovering it.

For the pathology of our modern society mediated by capital, of the proletarian form of social life and its self-objectifications, the new forms of humanity it makes possible, which are completely unprecedented in history, grows only worse the longer delayed is taking the possible and necessary steps to the next levels of the struggle for freedom.

The pathology grows worse, not merely in terms of the various forms of the destruction of humanity, which are daunting, but also, perhaps more importantly—and disturbingly—in the manifest worsening social conditions and capacities for practical politics on the Left, and our worsening theoretical awareness of them. If there has been a crisis and evacuation of Marxian thought, it has been because its most fundamental context and point of departure, its awareness of its greater historical moment, the possibility of an epochal transition, has been forgotten, while we have not ceased to share this moment, but only lost sight of its necessities and possibilities. Any future emancipatory politics must regain such awareness of the transitional nature of capitalist modernity and of the reasons why we pay such a steep price for failing to recognize this. |P

Raechel Tiffe

Platypus Review 7 | October 2008

[PDF]

I decided not to participate in any illegal protests at the RNC.

There’s a simple, material reason: Had I been arrested I would have been accountable for bail money (or unhappily relying on legal defense funds that I truly feel have more value elsewhere) and possibly a day’s worth of income. I have been and continue to be a member of the working class. I grew up with a single mother who worked two low-paying jobs, and for the past five years, living on my own, I have survived well below the poverty line. I am also currently uninsured and without health care. Culturallyspeaking, the working class community might not see me so equitably; I am, after all, college educated and on my path towards the ivory tower. But still, getting arrested was not financially feasible for me. I have rent to pay.

The other reason is a little more complicated. I was afraid that I wouldn’t agree with the whole agenda. I was proved right. I support: blockading the GOP buses, blocking intersections, radical dance parties in public space. I don’t support: smashing windows/cars, violent hate rhetoric (“What do we want? Bush Dead!”), and, most importantly, making abstractions out of human beings.

It is not surprising or necessarily regrettable that not everyone has the same version of anarchism. And so I am not angry that there are those who choose to interpret and perform it differently, but I am angry when that performance goes so blatantly against some of the fundamental elements of this “new world in our hearts” that so many radical/anarchist/progressives claim to want. And I am angry when—even if people aren’t moral pacifists—that a “movement” that claims to want the revolution can’t even see the relevance in strategic pacifism. To use the most obvious and simple example: the protesters during the Civil Rights movement did not fight back, the media captured it all, and they gained the vast majority of support from our nation. I’m not trying to say that the fight against capitalism is the same as the fight against racist legislation, but I am certainly not above borrowing tactics that actually worked.

True, I was a Peace Studies minor and am chock full of stories of peaceful victories. But I am no longer a blind pacifist. Given tangible goals, sometimes destruction makes sense. The Autonomen, the original Black Bloc, protected their squats through aggressive confrontation. This is a real, concrete goal. Fighting to end ‘Republican’ ideology is not. Breaking a Department store window will not end American conservativism.

The violence at the RNC seems to me completely goal-less. Worse, it stands in opposition to the solidarity we claim to embody. Macy’s windows and those smashed up cop cars are going to be fixed by working class men and women, probably pissed that they have to spend extra time replacing what was in perfectly good condition a day ago. Similarly, when anarchist groups participate in illegal action at Immigrant’s Rights marches, they do so with complete disregard for their “comrades” who would be deported were they to be nearby someone who was instigating the police. How’s that for solidarity?

When polarization occurs within the “movement” itself, we become weaker, more divided and further and further away from the revolution. I don’t think the solution is utopia- group-think. Cultural identity can motivate individuals towards greater and greater participation. But there needs to be an idea big enough for everyone to agree on, an idea that takes precedence over the fun of diverse tactics.

Imagine for a moment that the RNC Welcoming Committee decided to declare a complete commitment to non-violence. More Americans will participate in nonviolent actions that have less potential for getting them arrested than violent action that will, imagine that instead of figuring out how to hide hammers in their pants, the RNC Welcoming Committee went out and organized every single group that attended the mainstream march. Imagine now that those 50,000 people sitting in the intersection, blocking the GOP buses. The cops wouldn’t know what to do with themselves. The world would watch, and the radical left would gain sympathy and support.

A comrade noted that she thought we were supposed to be protesting the violence and hate perpetrated by the Bush/McCain regime, not re-enacting it. How can we, as revolutionaries dedicated to a just and peaceful world, create that through violence and hate? I believe in the power of temporary autonomous zones present in the spirit of political action in the streets, the creation of our new world in the ephemeral but blissful moments of united rebellion... but my new world has no smashed glass. My new world has no fear of attack. My new world has dance parties and kisses and laughter and music and vegan food and chants that make you feel so warm n’ fuzzy that you become physically incapable of causing harm to another!

My new world is not “us” taking over “them.” When the oppressed seek to overcome opression by becoming themselves oppressors, absolutely no one wins. When one attacks another human being who seems inhuman[e], the attacker too becomes inhuman[e] in that act. It is impossible to be fully present and human[e] in violence. As Paulo Friere wrote: “How can the oppressed, as divided unauthentic beings, participate in the pedagogy of their liberation? As long as they live in the duality in which to be is to be like, and to be like is to be like the oppressor, this contribution is impossible…. Liberation is thus a childbirth, and a painful one.” A childbirth, he writes, because it will be new and unlike anything we’ve seen before. We’ve seen violence before, we’ve seen things smashed and people hurt. But we haven’t yet seen our liberation.... |P

Chris Cutrone

Platypus Review 7 | October 2008

[PDF]

Barack Obama had, until recently, made his campaign for President of the United States a referendum on the invasion and occupation of Iraq. In the Democratic Party primaries, Obama attacked Hillary Clinton for her vote in favor of the invasion. Among Republican contenders, John McCain went out of his way to appear as the candidate most supportive of the Bush administration’s policy in Iraq. Looking towards the general election, it is over Iraq that the candidates have been most clearly opposed: Obama has sought to distinguish himself most sharply from McCain on Iraq, emphasizing their differences in judgment. Prior to the recent financial melt-down on Wall Street, there was a consistency of emphasis on Iraq as a signal issue of the campaign. But with Iraq dramatically pacified in recent months, its political importance has diminished. Obama’s position on Iraq has, if anything, lost him traction as the McCain-supported Bush policy has succeeded.

Now might be a good time to step back and look at assumptions regarding the politics of the war, and assess their true nature and character, what they have meant for the mainstream as well as for the ostensible “Left.”

One major assumption that has persisted from the beginning of the anti-war movement and over the course of the two presidential terms of the Bush administration has been that the Iraq war was the result of a maverick policy, in which “neoconservative” ideologues hijacked the U.S. government in order to implement an extreme agenda. Recently, more astute observers of American politics such as Adolph Reed (in “Where Obamaism seems to be going,” Black Agenda Report, July 16, 2008, on-line at blackagendareport.com) have conceded the point that a war in Iraq could easily have been embraced even by a Democratic adminstration. Reed writes:

“Lesser evilists assert as indisputable fact that Gore, or even Kerry, wouldn’t have invaded Iraq. Perhaps Gore wouldn’t have, but I can’t say that’s a sure thing. (And who was his running mate, by the way? [Joe Lieberman, who recently spoke in support of McCain at the Republican National Convention—CC.]) Moreover, we don’t know what other military adventurism that he —like Clinton— would have undertaken . . No, I’m not at all convinced that the Right wouldn’t have been able to hound either Gore into invading Iraq or Kerry into continuing the war indefinitely.”

This raises the issue of what “opposition” to the Iraq war policy of the Bush administration really amounts to. The Democrats’ jockeying for position is an excellent frame through which to examine the politics of the war. For the Democrats’ criticism of the Bush policy has been transparently opportunist, to seize upon the problems of the war for political gain against the Republicans. Opposition has come only to the extent that the war seemed to be a failed policy, something of which Obama has taken advantage because he was not in the U.S. Senate when the war authorization was voted, and so he has been able to escape culpability for this decision his fellow Democrats made when it was less opportune to oppose the war. (Recall that this fact was the occasion for Bill Clinton’s infamous remark that Obama’s supposed record of uncompromised opposition to the war was a “fairy tale,” for Clinton pointed out that Obama had admitted that he didn’t know how he would have voted had he been in the Senate at the time.) Furthermore, opposition to the war on the supposed “Left” has similarly focused on the Bush administration (for example in the very name of the anti-war coalition World Can’t Wait, i.e., until the next election, and their call to “Exorcise the Bush Regime”), thus playing directly into the politics of the Democratic Party, resulting now in either passive or active support of the Obama candidacy.

On Obama’s candidacy, Reed went on to say that

“Obama is on record as being prepared to expand the war [“on terror”] into Pakistan and maybe Iran . . He’s also made pretty clear that AIPAC [American-Israel Public Affairs Committee] has his ear, which does it for the Middle East, and I wouldn’t be shocked if his administration were to continue, or even step up, underwriting covert operations against Venezuela, Cuba (he’s already several times linked each of those two governments with North Korea and Iran) and maybe Ecuador or Bolivia. .This is where I don’t give two shits for the liberals’ criticism of Bush’s foreign policy: they don’t mind imperialism; they just want a more efficiently and rationally managed one. As Paul Street argues in Black Agenda Report, as well as in his forthcoming book Barack Obama and the Future of American Politics, an Obama presidency would further legitimize the imperialist orientation of US foreign policy by inscribing it as liberalism or the ‘new kind’ of progressivism. .[T]he bipartisan ‘support the troops’ rhetoric that has become a scaffold for discussing the war is a ruse for not addressing its foundation in a bellicose, imperialist foreign policy that makes the United States a scourge on the Earth. Obama, like other Dems, doesn’t want such a discussion any more than the Republicans do because they’re all committed to maintaining that foundation.”

In recognizing that the “liberals’ criticism of Bush’s foreign policy [doesn’t] mind imperialism; they just want a more efficiently and rationally managed one,” Reed and others’ arguments on the “Left” beg the question of U.S. “imperialism” and its place in the world. This is an unexamined inheritance from the Vietnam anti-war movement of the 1960s-70s that has become doxa on the “Left.” Put another way, it has been long since anyone questioned the meaning of “anti-imperialism”—asked, “as opposed to what?”

If, as Reed put it about Gore, Kerry, et al., that the “Right would have been able to hound” them into Iraq or other wars, this begs the question of why those on the “Left” would not regard Obama, Kerry, Gore, or (either) Clinton, not as beholden to the Right, but rather being themselves part of the Right, not “capitulating to” U.S. imperialism but part of its actual political foundation. There is an evident wish to avoid raising the question and problem of what is the actual nature and character of “U.S. imperialism” and its policies, what actually makes the U.S., as Reed put it, “a scourge on the Earth,” and what it means to oppose this from the “Left.” For it might indeed be the case that not only the Democrats don’t want such a discussion of the “foundation” of “U.S. imperialism” (“any more than the Republicans do”), but neither do those on the “Left.”

For Adolph Reed, as for any ostensible “Left,” the difficulty lies in the potential stakes of problematizing the role of U.S. power in the world. If the U.S. has proven to be, as Reed put it, a “scourge on the Earth,” the “Left” has consistently shied away from thinking about, or remained deeply confused and self-contradictory over the reasons for this—and what can and should be done about it.

Reed placed this problem in historical context by pointing out that:

“[E]very major party presidential candidate between 1956 and 1972—except one, Barry Goldwater, who ran partly on his willingness to blow up the world and was trounced for it—ran on a pledge to end the Vietnam War. Every one of them lied, except maybe Nixon the third time he made the pledge, but that time he had a lot of help from the North Vietnamese and Viet Cong.”

—But Nixon et al. would have gotten a lot more “help” living up to their pledges to end the U.S. war in Vietnam if the Communists had just laid down and died.

Was this the politics of the “big lie,” as Reed insists, echoing the criticisms of the Bush administration’s war policy, supposedly based on deceit, or is there a more simple and obvious explanation: that indeed, all American politicians were and remain committed to ending war, but only on their own, “U.S. imperial” terms? And why would anyone expect otherwise?

If this is the case, then, the difference between the Obama and McCain campaigns regarding U.S. “imperialism” would amount to no difference at all. Obama has pledged to remove U.S. troops from Iraq as quickly as possible, but only if the “security situation” allows this. McCain has pledged to remain in Iraq as long as it takes to “get the job done.” What’s the difference? Especially given that the Bush administration itself has begun troop reductions and has agreed in its negotiations with the government of Iraq to a “definite timetable” for withdrawal of U.S. combat troops, as the Sunni insurgency has been quelled or co-opted into the political process and Shia militias like Muqtada al-Sadr’s Mahdi Brigade have not only laid down their arms but are presently disbanding entirely. No less than Bush and McCain, Obama, too, is getting what he wants in Iraq. Everyone can declare “victory.” And they are doing so. (Obama can claim vindication the degree to which the pacification of Iraq seems more due to the political process there—such as the “Anbar awakening” movement, etc.—than to U.S. military intervention.)

All the doomsday scenarios are blowing away like so many mirages in the sand, revealing that the only differences that ever existed among Republicans and Democrats amounted to posturing over matters of detail in policy implementation and not over fundamental “principles.” This despite the Obama campaign’s sophistic qualifiers on the evident victory of U.S. policy in Iraq being merely a “tactical success within a strategic blunder,” and their pointing out that the greater goals of effective “political reconciliation” among Iraqi factions remain yet to be achieved. What was once regarded in the cynically hyperbolic “anti-war” rhetoric of the Democrats as an unmitigated “disaster” in Iraq is turning out to be something that merely could have been done better. The “Left” has echoed the hollowness of such rhetoric. At base, this has been the result of a severely mistaken if not entirely delusional imagination of the war and its causes.

At base, the U.S. did not invade and occupy Iraq to steal its oil, or for any other venal or nefarious reason, but rather because the U.N.’s 12-year-old sanctions against Saddam Hussein’s Baathist government, which meant the compromise and undermining of effective Iraqi sovereignty (for instance in the carving of an autonomous Kurdish zone under U.N. and NATO military protection) was unraveling in the oil-for-food scandal etc., and Saddam, after the first grave mistake of invading Kuwait, made the further fateful errors of spiting the U.N. arms inspectors and counting on being able to balance the interests of the European and other powers in the U.N. against the U.S. threat of invasion and occupation. The errors of judgment and bad-faith opportunism of Saddam, the Europeans, and others were as much the cause for the war as any policy ambitions of the neocons in the Bush administration. Iraq was becoming a “failed state,” and not least because of the actions of its indisputably horrifically oppressive rulers. If Saddam could not help but to choose among such bad alternatives for Iraq, this stands as indictment of the Baathist regime, its unviable character in a changing world. The niche carved out by the combination of Cold War geopolitics and the international exploitation of the Iran-Iraq war of the 1980s for the Baathist shop of horrors was finally, mercifully, closing.

The unraveling of the U.N. sanctions regime prior to the 2003 invasion and occupation, enforced not only by the U.S. and Britain but by neighboring states and others, cannot be separated from the history of the disintegration of the Iraqi state. The armchair quarterbacking of “anti-war” politics was from the outset (and remains to this day) tacitly, shame-facedly, in favor of the status quo (and worse, today, must retrospectively try to distort and apologize for the history of Baathism). In comparison with such evasion of responsibility, the Bush administration’s invasion and occupation of Iraq was an eminently responsible act. They were willing to stake themselves in a way the Democrats and the Europeans and others were not—and the “Left” could not. The “success” of the Bush policy amounts to its ability to cast all alternatives into more or less impotent posturing. Attributing motives for the war to American profiteering is to mistake effect for cause. Complaining about the fact that American companies have profited from the war is to impotently protest against the world as it is, for someone was going to profit from it—would it be better if French, Japanese or Saudi firms did so?

That the U.S. government under Bush broke decorum and made the gesture of invading Iraq “unilaterally” without U.N. Security Council approval says nothing to the fact that Iraq was likely to be invaded and occupied (by “armed inspection teams” supported by tens of thousands of “international” troops, etc.) in any case. Did it really matter whether the U.S. had the U.N. fig leaf covering the ugliness of its military instrument? It was only a matter of when and how it was going to be put to use, in managing the international problem the Iraqi state had become. No one among the international powers-that-be, including the most “rogue” elements of the global order (Russia, China, Iran, et al.) had any firm interest in restoring to Saddam’s Baathists the status quo from before 1990 and, needless to say, not only the U.S. and Britain, but also Saudi Arabia and Iran, and most especially the Iraqi Kurds and Shia, were not about to let that happen. Saddam was on the way out. It was only a matter of how.

All the rhetoric about the “overreach” and “hubris” of U.S. policy in Iraq says nothing to the fact that a crossroads there was being reached—this was already true under Clinton. All the bombast about the “illegal”—or even “criminal”—character of the U.S. invasion and occupation of Iraq neglects the simple fact that the U.S. occupation was authorized by the U.N. When Democrats impugn the “crusading” motives of the Bush administration with sophistry about the supposed folly of trying to spread “democracy” in Iraq and the greater Middle East, is this a “progressive” argument, or a conservative one?

Not only the Democrats’ but the “Left’s” opposition to the Iraq war has in fact been from the Right. This is revealed most perversely by the history of the Iraq policy recommendations of Joe Biden, who has been touted by the Obama campaign as bringing “foreign policy credentials” to their ticket as candidate for Vice President. Biden once advocated a break-up of Iraq into separate Shia, Sunni and Kurdish states, during the height of the Sunni insurgency, which would have punished the Sunni by leaving them without access to Iraq’s oil wealth (which is concentrated in the Kurdish and Shiite areas of Kirkuk and Basra). Would pursuit of such an ethno-sectarian division of Iraq have been a “progressive” outcome for furthering the “democratic self-determination” of the peoples of Iraq?—In comparison with the 20% troop “surge” that has in fact, as even Obama has put it, “succeeded beyond our wildest dreams.” Or might we see in such apparently “extreme” policy alternatives as Biden’s a deeper underlying fact, that from the standpoint of not only U.S. “imperial” interests but those of the global order, it doesn’t make much difference if Iraq remains a single or is broken up into multiple states, whether it is ruled by secular or theocratic regimes, or whether its government is “democratic” or dictatorial, whether its civil society is “liberal” or not. But, presumably, this matters a great deal to the Iraqis!

None of the posed alternatives regarding Iraq—not before, during or since the invasion and occupation—can be ascribed to being inherently in service of or opposed to the on-going realities of U.S. power (“imperialism”), or the interests of global capitalism, because all of them are compatible with these. Rather, the policy alternatives are all matters of opportunistic orientation to an underlying reality that is not being substantially challenged or even recognized politically by any of the actors involved, great or small, on the “Right” or “Left,” from al-Qaeda to the neoconservatives, or “libertarians” like Ron Paul, from Bush to the President of the Iranian Islamic Republic Ahmadinejad, and Republicans and Democrats from McCain to Obama, or “independents” and the Green Party’s candidates Cynthia McKinney and Ralph Nader, to the far-“Left” of “anarchists” and other antinomians like writers for Counterpunch and the Chomskyans, et al. at Z magazine, or the “anti-war” protest coalitions led by “Marxist” groups such as the International Socialist Organization (United for Peace and Justice coalition, Campus Anti-war Network), Workers World Party (ANSWER coalition), or the Revolutionary Communist Party (World Can’t Wait coalition).

All of the supposed “anti-imperialists”—from Iraq policy dissident Republicans like Senator Chuck Hagel, to the most intransigent “Marxists” like the Spartacist League—have failed to be truly anti-“imperialist” in their approach to Iraq, nor could they be, for none could have possibly challenged the fundamental conditions of U.S. power in global capital. There is no politics of anti-imperialism, for no one asks politically whether and what it means to say that the U.S. could be more or less “imperialist,” whether the world order can do without the U.S. acting as global cop—asking, who, for instance, would play this nevertheless necessary role in the absence of the U.S.? For there is no one. And no purported “Left” should want “openings” for their own sake in the global order—as if any “cracks” in the “system” won’t be the holes into which the world’s most abject will be immediately swallowed, without in any way sparing the next batch of victims in the train-wreck of history.

The fundamental inability of anyone on the “Left” to take a meaningfully alternative position on Iraq, beyond hoping (vainly) for the “defeat” of or “resistance” to U.S. policy, and thus immediately joining the opportunism of the politics of the Democrats, dissident Republicans, and European and other statesmen, should serve as a warning about the dire political state of the world and its possibilities today. Accusations might fly about who may more or less tacitly “support” “U.S. imperialism,” but there is such a thing as protesting too much, especially when it must be admitted that nothing can be done right now to alter the given global political and social realities in a progressive-emancipatory manner. If, as Adolph Reed put it, the U.S. remains a “scourge on the Earth,” is the alternative only to impotently denounce this and not try to properly understand it—and understand what it would mean to prepare to begin to meaningfully challenge and overcome this?

As appalling as it might be to recognize, McCain in his Republican National Convention speech was actually more truthful and straightforward than Obama when he pointed out that he has stood consistently behind what has proved to be a successful policy in Iraq. Obama now must dissemble on the issue.

On the other hand, the essence of Obama’s candidacy can be seen in the figure of Samantha Power, who was sacked from his primary campaign after saying, correctly, that Hillary Clinton was a “monster” who would “say anything” to get elected. Power is a liberal promoter of “human rights” military interventionism, and began working as a senior advisor for Obama immediately after he was elected to the U.S. Senate. Power is a representative of Obama’s version of the historical precedent of JFK’s team of “the best and the brightest” such as Robert McNamara. In fact, Obama’s candidacy has been in its origins much more about “foreign” than “domestic” policy, and more than will be apparent now that Iraq has been neutralized as the main issue in the election. Obama, no less than McCain, is campaigning for the office not only of the “top cop” of the U.S., but of the world. Obama’s campaign is over effective policy for this role, not the role itself.

The “Left” is now up in arms in the face of Obama’s candidacy because his campaign explicitly aims to refurbish the U.S. government’s capacity to play this role, and perhaps even in expanded ways, as U.S. power would be equipped to advance the liberal cause of “human rights” internationally more idealistically and less cynically than under Bush or Clinton.

But this raises the issue of how to understand the U.S.’s role in the world. Only at its peril does the Left treat the explicit Wilsonian doctrine that has essentially underwritten U.S. policy and power after the First World War as hypocritical or cynical, for the project of the U.S. as the central, without-peer hegemonic power of global capital is one in which all states internationally participate (through the U.N., the international treaty organization of U.S. power), only to a greater or lesser extent. Maintaining the “peaceful” conditions of capital has and will continue to prove a bloody business at global scale. As much as one might wish otherwise or simply regret the onus of U.S. power, reality must be faced.

The hyperbole around Iraq in mainstream politics is best illustrated by that favored word, “quagmire.” But behind this has been hysteria, not reason. Feeling in one’s step the pull of some gum on the pavement is not the threat of sinking into quicksand! The Iraqi “insurgents” knew better than their apologists and cynical anti-Bush well-wishers among the Democrats and European and other powers—and their open cheerleaders on the “Left” —that they were not so intransigent, not so willing to die to a last man in their “opposition” to the U.S. and its policies, but only wished to drive a harder bargain at the negotiating table with the U.S. and its allies in Iraq—and now they are themselves becoming allies of the Iraqi government and the U.S.

Currently, it might still remain unclear whether the combined actions and apparent attenuation of the Iraqi insurgents/militias and the struggle among the ruling and oppositional parties of the Iraqi government and, behind them, their foreign backers in Saudi Arabia and Iran, and the apparent disarray of the regime of the Iranian Islamic Republic in its nuclear standoff with the U.S. and European powers, amount to a temporary situation borne of a shared wish to ride the Obama train (or merely the potential for change inherent in the election cycle) into a better bargaining position regarding U.S. policy and so not to spoil the U.S. election and bring the supposedly more bellicose John McCain to power through the fear of the American public, or whether they’ve given up the bloody game of jockeying for influence in Iraq because they’ve already spent what chips they had in the last 5 years.

In any case, as far as the election is concerned, Obama has played a strategy in his campaign from which any purported “Left” must learn politically: that it is not a good idea to bank ahead of time on the defeat of one’s opponents. Obama’s campaign is in more trouble than it might have been because it has lost its signal issue with which to prosecute the Republicans with the Bush administration, a “losing” war in Iraq. Obama can be elected despite this, and fudge the issue of the war and “opposition” to it as policy.

But the “Left” remains in a similar but in fact much worse predicament. The “Left” never asked the burning question: What if the Bush policy “succeeds?” Then what will be the basis for opposition to U.S. “imperialism?”

Iraq is nothing like Vietnam, despite the wishes of the “Left” to have history repeat itself. If Iraq does not , as it appears it will not, fall apart or drag on in endless slaughter, but continues to stabilize, and does not give up sovereignty over its oil resources, etc., but simply allows the U.S. some minimal military presence through its embassy there, and continues to work with the U.S. against groups like al-Qaeda, Iran’s Revolutionary Guards, Hezbollah, the Kurdish PKK guerillas in Turkey, and willingly sides with the U.S., as it will inevitably, in any potential future wars against Iran or Syria, etc., will this mean that the U.S. invasion and occupation diminished Iraqi “sovereignty” and so was a phenomenon of U.S. “imperialism?” What will be the account of Iraqi motives in the arrangement achieved by U.S. intervention, as mere stooges for the U.S.?

And won’t this mean taking a much coarser and narrower- minded view of the actual concrete politics of Iraq and the Middle East than those evinced by Obama, McCain and (even) Bush, so effectively disqualifying the “Left” as being in any way competent to comment, let alone critique or offer political alternatives?

What will remain the basis for the “Left’s” opposition to U.S. policy in a world McCain or Obama would make after Bush — after Blackwater, et al. quit the Iraqi scene, as they already are doing, and not through defeat but success, and not without some selective high-profile (if become less interesting) investigations and prosecutions of “war crimes” by Americans, now that the U.S. can afford them?

How will U.S. power in the world be understood, and what critique and vision of the future will be posed in the face of its undiminished capacities? |P

Chris Cutrone

[English]  [Ελληνικό]  [Deutsch]

La siguiente charla tuvo lugar en el marco del debate sobre ‘La crisis en el pensamiento marxista’ que se realizó en el foro público Marxist-Humanist Committee organizado por la Platypus Affiliated Society de Chicago el Viernes 25 de Julio del año 2008.

Mi propósito en esta charla es presentar una discusión sobre el significado de la historia para cualquier izquierda que se asuma marxista.

En Platypus hacemos eje en la historia de la izquierda porque pensamos que la narrativa histórica que uno cuente no es otra cosa que una teoría del presente. Implicita o explicitamente, la concepción de la historia que se adopta constituye una toma de posición respecto de como el presente ha llegado a ser lo que es hoy. Al centrarnos en la historia de la izquierda, y al adoptar una perspectiva política cuyo eje es esta mirada izquierdista de la historia, estamos sosteniendo como hipótesis que las características determinantes de nuestro presente tal como lo conocemos son el resultado de lo que la izquierda ha hecho históricamente por acción u omisión.

En el marco específico de esta charla, voy a presentar la mirada más amplia posible para el planteo de tales cuestiones y de los problemas ligados al desarrollo del capital en la historia. Me refiero al contexto más amplio desde el cual se pueda pensar la historia de la izquierda desde una perspectiva que se asuma marxista.

En este sentido, por ejemplo, no voy a referirme a cuestiones que son fundamentales para el análisis que Platypus hace de la historia de las diferentes fases del capital. Tampoco me centraré en el modo en que en el presente sufrimos la acumulación de al menos tres generaciones de regresión en la izquierda: la primera tragedia en los años treinta, la farsa de los años sesenta y la más reciente esterilidad de los años noventa. En este sentido me limitaré a decir que para Platypus el reconocimiento de la regresión y el intento de entender su relevancia y sus causas constituyen quizá nuestro punto de partida más importante. El tema que presentaré en esta charla se relaciona con los supuestos fundamentales de nuestra concepción de la regresión.

Por una cuestión de brevedad no voy a citar explicitamente ciertas obras, pero me gustaría dejar en claro que tengo una deuda no solo con Marx y Engels, sino también con Rosa Luxemburgo, Lenin, Trotsky, Georg Lukács, Karl Korsh, Walter Benjamin y Theodor Adorno y, finalmente pero no por eso menos relevante, también tengo una deuda importante con Moishe Postone. En adelante entraré en un diálogo que involucra las ideas de estos/as escritores/as en relación con Hegel, quien identificó la historia filosófica como una historia del desarrollo de la razón. Para Hegel, de hecho, la historia solo tiene sentido en tanto y en cuanto constituya la historia de la libertad.

El capital no tiene precedentes en la historia de la humanidad, por lo tanto cualquier lucha por la emancipación que se plantee ir más allá del capital tampoco tiene precedentes. Aunque existe una relación entre el carácter sin precedentes del surgimiento histórico del capital y de las luchas que intentan ir más allá de su lógica, tan relación puede ser muy confusa, llevando a una falsa simetría entre la transición hacia y entre los diferentes períodos de las transformaciones del capital moderno y una transición que vaya más allá del capital. La revuelta del Tercer Estado, que inició una historia de revoluciones democrático-burguesas que lejos de haber sido agotadas continúan desarrollándose, constituye la base sobre la cual se monta la perspectiva marxista, y al mismo tiempo, también constituye una forma social obsoleta que la política proletaria socialista pretende superar.

En tanto teórico de la Revolución Francesa de 1789 que inició la era de las grandes revoluciones burguesas que marcaron el surgimiento del capital moderno, Hegel fue también un filósofo de la revuelta del Tercer Estado. Marx, en cambio, tuvo que enfrentar problemáticas diferentes luego de que la revolución industrial del siglo XIX planteara otros desafíos. Aunque muchas veces desde el marxismo mismo no se entienda la idea hasta sus últimas consecuencias, con frecuencia se ha dicho que Marx planteó que la misión histórica del proletariado con conciencia de clase no era otra que la superación del capitalismo en tanto sociedad de clases. Tradicionalmente esta superación del capitalismo implicó una paradoja en la que se conjugaban el fin de la prehistoria y el inicio de una nueva historia de la humanidad. En este sentido, la dualidad de la posibilidad de un fin y un verdadero comienzo fue una respuesta a la noción hegeliana de derecha que establecía una clausura con el fin de la historia, que usualmente es reivindicado por los apologistas del capital como el mejor de los mundos posibles.

En otra afirmación famosa, que podemos encontrar en el Manifiesto Comunista, Marx y Engels sostuvieron que toda la historia existente hasta ese momento había sido la historia de la lucha de clases. Engels agregó un pie de página que reflexivamente especificaba “toda la historia escrita”. De aquí podríamos inferir que Engels se refería a la historia de la civilización. La historia de la lucha de clases no pertenecía, por ejemplo, a la historia humana o a la vida social previa a la formación de las clases sociales, al tiempo del supuesto “comunismo primitivo”. Más tarde, en 1942 (en sus ‘Reflexiones sobre la teoría de clases’), Adorno se apoyaba en la obra de Benjamin (las ‘Tesis sobre la filosofía de la historia”, 1940) para sostener que tal concepción de Marx y Engels de toda la historia como historia de la lucha de clases era en realidad una crítica de toda la historia, una crítica de la historia misma.

La pregunta que se nos plantea entonces es: de qué modo la crítica de la historia importa en relación con la crítica del capital? El problema de responder esta pregunta en términos del capitalismo como un sistema cuyo rasgo primario es la explotación es que en este sentido el capitalismo no se distingue de otras formas sociales. Aquello que constituye al capital como una forma social peculiar diferente de todas las demás es la dominación social. Tal peculiaridad no puede reducirse a la explotación, sino que por lo contrario, la dominación social debe ser distinguida como diferente de la explotación en términos lógicos e históricos, estructurales y empíricos. La dominación social significa la dominación de la sociedad por parte del capital. Este es el carácter nuevo del capital en la historia de la civilización, las formas sociales previas conocieron la dominación social directa de ciertos grupos sociales sobre otros. Sin embargo, esas formas de dominación nunca implicaron una dinámica social a la que estuviera sujeta la sociedad como un todo que involucra al conjunto de cada uno de los grupos sociales en todos sus aspectos.

En nuestro análisis comparativo de la historia de la humanidad debemos marcar una primera línea de demarcación que comenzó hace unos diez mil años con los orígenes de la civilización y de la sociedad de clases. Es el momento en el cual se produjo la revolución agrícola de la era neolítica y la humanidad realizó una transición de las sociedades nómades dedicadas a la caza y la recolección hacia el sedentarismo agrícola. En ese momento el campesinado se convirtió en el modo predominante de vida para la mayor parte de la humanidad, y así siguió siendo durante la mayor parte de la historia subsecuente.

Hace unos pocos cientos de años atrás, sin embargo, se produjo otra transformación comparable en términos de la profundidad del cambio que implicó. Esta transformación ha arrasado con el modo de vida campesino empujando a masas humanas de todo el planeta a convertirse en trabajadores/as urbanos/as: asalariados/as que se abocan a la confección de manufacturas industriales. Hacia fines del siglo XVII y principios del XIX, cuando esta transformación histórica se consolidaba con la revolución industrial, ciertos aspectos de la era de la sociedad “burguesa” se manifestaron de un modo que dio a esta historia del surgimiento de la modernidad un nuevo carácter. En vez de ser un “fin de la historia” tal como el pensamiento burgués había sostenido hasta entonces, la vida social moderna entró en una fase de severa crisis que problematizó la transición del campesinado a una sociedad basada en vendedores de fuerza de trabajo. Y en este contexto es que Marx en el siglo XIX toma conciencia de que la sociedad burguesa, junto con todas sus categorías de subjetividad que incluyen la valorización del trabajo, no tendría sino un carácter transicional en sí misma. Que la meta de la humanidad podría no encontrarse en el individuo productivo de la teoría y práctica burguesa, sino que por lo contrario, esta sociedad podría incubar contradicciones que apuntaran más allá de ella misma y hacia un potencial de transformación cualitativa tal vez tan profunda como la que separó la vida campesina de la del proletariado urbano. Una transición que estaría a la altura de la profundidad del cambio que tuvo lugar con la llegada de la agricultura en el período de la revolución neolítica hace diez mil años, cuando este cambio acabó con la vida de caza y recolección para una parte significativa de la humanidad. Una transformación más profunda que la que tuvo lugar en la transición de la sociedad tradicional a la moderna.

En el seno de la sociedad burguesa moderna que se consolidaba hacia el siglo XVIII, un nuevo fenómeno histórico sin precedentes se manifestaba en la vida política: la “izquierda”. Si bien es cierto que la disputa de valores siempre existió a lo largo de la historia, tal disputa nunca se formuló en términos de “progreso” histórico tal como lo formuló por primera vez la izquierda que convirtió a esta idea en su sello distintivo.

La Revolución Industrial de los inicios del siglo XIX, la introducción de la maquinaria, fue acompañada por el desarrollo de utopías socialistas optimistas y entusiastas que eran resultado de nuevos desarrollos que apuntaban hacia posibilidades fantásticas expresadas por la imaginación de Fourier y Saint-Simón entre otros.

Marx entendió la sociedad del “derecho burgués” y la “propiedad privada” como una formación que ya descansaba en la constitución social del trabajo como mediador del cual se derivaba la propiedad privada. En este marco Marx se preguntó si la trayectoria de esta sociedad desde la revuelta del Tercer Estado y la era de la manufactura en el siglo XVIII hasta la era de la Revolución Industrial en el siglo XIX no indicaba ya en potencia la posibilidad de un desarrollo ulterior.

En el seno de las transformaciones sociales dramáticas que recorrieron el siglo XIX, Marx escribió en el Manifiesto Comunista que “todo lo sólido se desvanece en el aire”. Ya en 1843 Marx pronosticaba la futura virtual proletarización de la sociedad y se preguntaba si era posible y bajo qué condiciones la humanidad devenida proletariado podría liberarse a sí misma de tal condición, si era posible que el proletariado “trascendiera” su propia existencia “aboliéndose a sí mismo”. En los Manuscritos de 1844, Marx reconocía que el socialismo (de Proudhon y otros/as) era en sí mismo un síntoma del capital: el trabajo proletario era constitutivo del capital, y por tanto su política era una expresión de cómo la sociedad articulada por el capital podía revelarse a sí misma como una forma social transicional que apuntara a su propia superación. Este era el punto de partida fundamental de Marx, la idea de que la proletarización era un problema social sustantivo. No un problema que meramente pusiera en jaque los intereses de la burguesía, sino una cuestión social de implicancias más bastas. La proletarización del conjunto de la sociedad no implicaba la superación del capital sino más bien su realización más completa. Y esa forma más desarrollada del capital contenida en la proletarización de la sociedad en su conjunto apuntaba más allá de sí misma. Fue en este marco que la filosofía izquierdista de la historia nació. Marx no era un socialista o un comunista sino más bien un pensador que se había propuesto comprender el significado del surgimiento del socialismo proletario en el seno de la historia. Marx no era ni el mejor ni el más consistente de los socialistas radicales, sino el más histórico, y por tanto, el que mayor autoconciencia había logrado. Marx entendió el término socialismo “científico” en el sentido de una forma de conocimiento que fuera autoconsciente de sus propias condiciones de posibilidad.

Desde una perspectiva hegeliana o marxista, la clarificación de la especificidad del moderno problema de la libertad social no se deduce sociológicamente, ya sea en términos de clase socioeconómica o en términos de un principio colectivista que esté por encima de lo individual, etc. Por el contrario, la libertad social solo puede entenderse como un problema de conciencia, específicamente, de conciencia histórica.

Desde que Marx planteó esta nueva mirada, fue la conciencia de la historia y de su potencial y posibilidades lo que distinguió a la izquierda de la derecha, por más utópica o confusa que esa perspectiva izquierdista pudiera llegar a ser. La lucha contra la opresión devino un factor secundario, dado que la derecha moderna también plantea un programa de abolición de la opresión. La derecha no representa al pasado sino más bien a la clausura de las potencialidades contenidas en el presente.

En este sentido, el factor fundamental de regresión de las posibilidades de la izquierda hoy, tanto en el plano de la teoría como en el de la práctica, está relacionado con el modo en que esta ha abandonado la conciencia histórica, y en cambio favorece la inmediatez de las luchas contra la opresión.

La crítica marxista del socialismo sintomático que iba desde Proudhon, Lassalle, Bakunin y otros/as hasta la de sus seguidores/as en el nuevo Partido Socialdemócrata Alemán en el Programa de Gotha (que luego se plasmaría de modo similar en el cuestionamiento engelsiano del Programa de Erfurt), tenía como blanco mantener la conciencia histórica del horizonte de posibilidades que abría una sociedad post-capitalista y post-proletaria.

Desafortunadamente, ya en vida misma de Marx, la forma de la política que pretendía inspirar no siempre alcanzó el umbral de su crucial conciencia de la historia. Una cuota importante de la regresión ha tenido lugar en el nombre mismo del “Marxismo”. A lo largo de la historia del marxismo se ha repetido una tragedia. Se trata de un problema que se manifestó desde las disputas contra el anarquismo en la primera internacional a las disputas en la Segunda internacional, las rupturas que tuvieron lugar con el surgimiento de la tercera internacional liderada por el bolchevismo, y finalmente el ascenso del trotskismo y de la cuarta. Retrospectivamente podríamos decir que existieron luchas abrumadoramente trágicas por preservar y recuperar algo del punto de partida inicial del socialismo proletario.

En la segunda mitad del siglo XX el carácter de la regresión ha adquirido tal magnitud y se halla tan distante de la autoconciencia marxista original que el marxismo en si mismo ha devenido una ideología positiva de la sociedad industrial, y el potencial de la sociedad post-capitalista ha sido oscurecido, encontrando una expresión por demás obtusa, en varias ideologías utópicas. En las últimas décadas la hegemonía de las ideologías anarquistas y el rechazo romántico de la modernidad dominan casi por completo el panorama político.

Incluso más allá del punto de crisis y de regresión respecto de la autoconciencia marxista original, la izquierda misma, que surgió antes de los intentos de Hegel y Marx por teorizar su importancia histórica, está virtualmente desaparecida. En la actualidad resulta sumamente difícil distinguir entre respuestas al capital desde ideologías conservadoras y reaccionarias por un lado y progresistas y emancipadoras por otro. Tal confusión es inseparable de la bancarrota y desaparición del movimiento social iniciado por el socialismo proletario al que Marx había intentado otorgar una autoconciencia más adecuada y provocativa en el momento de su surgimiento en el siglo XIX.

Paradójicamente, tal como Lukács, siguiendo a Luxemburg y Lenin, ya notó cerca de cien años atrás, mientras que la posibilidad de superar al capitalismo en ciertos sentidos se encuentra objetivamente más cercana, en otros sentidos parece haber retrocedido infinitamente más allá del horizonte de posibilidades. Debemos recordar la reflexión de Luxemburgo sobre el oportunismo que siempre nos amenaza, no en términos de traición política o de caída en el pecado, sino más bien en términos de la manifestación de un miedo muy real que subyace a la más mínima manifestación de los riesgos involucrados en el intento de mover el mundo más allá del capital.

Aún peor – y en los tiempos que corren esto resulta previo a cualquier peligro de ‘oportunismo’ – con la extrema si no completa desintegración de nuestra capacidad para aprehender y transformar el capital a través de la política de clase ha llegado nuestra imposibilidad de incluso reconocer y entender nuestra realidad social en sus sentidos más básicos. No sufrimos meramente de oportunismo sino de una desorientación aún más primaria. Hoy no nos enfrentamos al problema de cambiar el mundo, sino de entenderlo.

Por otro lado, ¿acercándonos al marxismo socialista, estamos lidiando con una ‘utopía’? Y si ese fuera el caso, ¿cómo encarar la cuestión? ¿Cuál es la importancia de nuestro sentido ‘utópico’ del potencial humano más allá del capital y del trabajo proletario? ¿Se trata de un mero sueño? Marx comenzó con el socialismo utópico y terminó con la ideología política moderna más espectacular aunque fallida: el ‘socialismo científico’. Al mismo tiempo, Marx nos dio un sentido agudo e incisivo del marco crítico necesario para entender las razones por las cuales los últimos dos cientos años han sido, de lejos, los más tumultuosos y transformativos. Incluso cuando al mismo tiempo estos dos siglos han sido también la época más destructiva de la civilización humana. Marx nos ofrece un marco para entender por qué este período prometió tanto cuando en realidad nos desilusionó amargamente. Los últimos dos siglos han visto más cambios que los milenios previos. Marx intentó comprender las razones de esta transformación vertiginosa. Otros intentos de explicar este fenómeno no pudieron ver la diferencia y han tratado de reasimilar la historia moderna a la historia tradicional que existió en el pasado (por ejemplo, es el caso de las ilusiones postmodernas de un medievalismo sin fin: ver el libro de Bruno Latour, Nunca hemos sido modernos, 1993).

¿Qué significaría entender el conjunto del proyecto marxiano como, primero y principal, un reconocimiento de que la modernidad como un todo no es más que una patología de transición de la sociedad de clases que emergió con la agricultura diez mil años atrás a través del surgimiento de la forma de la mercancía como mediación social que nos condujo hacia el presente globalizado del capital y que puede conducirnos hacia una forma de humanidad que podría situarse más allá de todo esto?

Marx nos hizo encarar la autoconciencia de una obscura y misteriosa tarea histórica, que solo puede clarificarse teóricamente mediante la práctica transformadora, la práctica del socialismo proletario. Pero esta tarea ha sido abandonada en favor de lo que esencialmente son luchas que reconstituyen al capital, que intentan lidiar con la vicisitudes de la dinámica de la historia moderna. Esta reasimilación del marxismo en la ideología característica de la revuelta del Tercer Estado implica una pérdida del verdadero horizonte de posibilidades que posibilitó la teoría de Marx y le dio a su proyecto relevancia y urgencia.

¿Podemos seguir a Marx y a los/as mejores representantes revolucionarios/as marxistas que fueron consecuentes con su proyecto en el reconocimiento de que las formas de descontento en una sociedad patológica como la que habitamos son sintomáticas del mismo problema contra el que se alzan? ¿Podemos evitar la actitud post-capitalista prematura y el utopismo reaccionario más bajo que subyace a la presente muerte de la izquierda en la teoría y la práctica y en cambio llevar a cabo las tareas que nos ha legado la historia? ¿Podemos reconocer el aliento y profundidad del problema que yace ante nosotros/as y que pretendemos resolver sin retroceder a las ilusiones del pensamiento y la ideología del hecho consumado? ¿Caeremos en la apología del impulso que empuja directamente contra la tarea que deberíamos emprender a expensas de llegar a conocer lo que yace más allá de las trampas del sufrimiento presente?

Necesitamos una conciencia aguda y urgente de nuestra época histórica tanto como del efímero ahora en el que nos encontramos. Debemos preguntarnos cuál es la característica del momento presente que podría conllevar la posibilidad de recuperar una conciencia social y política marxista viable, y cómo es que podemos avanzar en el entendido de esa recuperación.

El problema es que la patología de nuestra sociedad moderna mediada por el capital, de la forma proletaria de vida social y sus objetivaciones, de las nuevas formas de humanidad cuyas posibilidades abre, las cuales no tienen precedentes en la historia, se vuelve cada vez peor a medida que se retrasa la oportunidad de los pasos posibles y necesarios hacia los niveles que siguen en la lucha por la libertad.

La patología crece y empeora, no meramente porque se profundicen las formas de destrucción de la humanidad, que son aterradoras, sino también, y quizás esto es aún más importante – y aterrador – en el manifiesto empeoramiento de las condiciones sociales necesaria para que se recuperen las capacidades práctico-políticas de la izquierda, y de nuestra creciente incapacidad de comprensión. Si ha habido una crisis y evacuación de pensamiento marxista, ha sido porque su contexto fundamental y punto de partida, su conciencia del gran momento histórico, la posibilidad de una transformación epocal, ha sido olvidada, mientras que nosotro/as no hemos escapado al momento, sino que solo hemos perdido vista de las necesidades y posibilidades. Cualquier política emancipadora futura debe volver a ganar esta conciencia de la naturaleza transicional de la modernidad capitalista y de las razones por la que pagamos un precio muy alto por no reconocer tal transición. |P

[La siguiente charla tuvo lugar en el marco del debate sobre ‘La crisis en el pensamiento marxista’ que se realizó en el foro público Marxist-Humanist Committee organizado por la Platypus Affiliated Society de Chicago el Viernes 25 de Julio del año 2008]

Mi propósito en esta charla es presentar una discusión sobre el significado de la historia para cualquier izquierda que se asuma marxista.

En Platypus hacemos eje en la historia de la izquierda porque pensamos que la narrativa histórica que uno cuente no es otra cosa que una teoría del presente. Implicita o explicitamente, la concepción de la historia que se adopta constituye una toma de posición respecto de como el presente ha llegado a ser lo que es hoy. Al centrarnos en la historia de la izquierda, y al adoptar una perspectiva política cuyo eje es esta mirada izquierdista de la historia, estamos sosteniendo como hipótesis que las características determinantes de nuestro presente tal como lo conocemos son el resultado de lo que la izquierda ha hecho históricamente por acción u omisión.

En el marco específico de esta charla, voy a presentar la mirada más amplia posible para el planteo de tales cuestiones y de los problemas ligados al desarrollo del capital en la historia. Me refiero al contexto más amplio desde el cual se pueda pensar la historia de la izquierda desde una perspectiva que se asuma marxista.

En este sentido, por ejemplo, no voy a referirme a cuestiones que son fundamentales para el análisis que Platypus hace de la historia de las diferentes fases del capital. Tampoco me centraré en el modo en que en el presente sufrimos la acumulación de al menos tres generaciones de regresión en la izquierda: la primera tragedia en los años treinta, la farsa de los años sesenta y la más reciente esterilidad de los años noventa. En este sentido me limitaré a decir que para Platypus el reconocimiento de la regresión y el intento de entender su relevancia y sus causas constituyen quizá nuestro punto de partida más importante. El tema que presentaré en esta charla se relaciona con los supuestos fundamentales de nuestra concepción de la regresión.

Por una cuestión de brevedad no voy a citar explicitamente ciertas obras, pero me gustaría dejar en claro que tengo una deuda no solo con Marx y Engels, sino también con Rosa Luxemburgo, Lenin, Trotsky, Georg Lukács, Karl Korsh, Walter Benjamin y Theodor Adorno y, finalmente pero no por eso menos relevante, también tengo una deuda importante con Moishe Postone. En adelante entraré en un diálogo que involucra las ideas de estos/as escritores/as en relación con Hegel, quien identificó la historia filosófica como una historia del desarrollo de la razón. Para Hegel, de hecho, la historia solo tiene sentido en tanto y en cuanto constituya la historia de la libertad.

El capital no tiene precedentes en la historia de la humanidad, por lo tanto cualquier lucha por la emancipación que se plantee ir más allá del capital tampoco tiene precedentes. Aunque existe una relación entre el carácter sin precedentes del surgimiento histórico del capital y de las luchas que intentan ir más allá de su lógica, tan relación puede ser muy confusa, llevando a una falsa simetría entre la transición hacia y entre los diferentes períodos de las transformaciones del capital moderno y una transición que vaya más allá del capital. La revuelta del Tercer Estado, que inició una historia de revoluciones democrático-burguesas que lejos de haber sido agotadas continúan desarrollándose, constituye la base sobre la cual se monta la perspectiva marxista, y al mismo tiempo, también constituye una forma social obsoleta que la política proletaria socialista pretende superar.

En tanto teórico de la Revolución Francesa de 1789 que inició la era de las grandes revoluciones burguesas que marcaron el surgimiento del capital moderno, Hegel fue también un filósofo de la revuelta del Tercer Estado. Marx, en cambio, tuvo que enfrentar problemáticas diferentes luego de que la revolución industrial del siglo XIX planteara otros desafíos. Aunque muchas veces desde el marxismo mismo no se entienda la idea hasta sus últimas consecuencias, con frecuencia se ha dicho que Marx planteó que la misión histórica del proletariado con conciencia de clase no era otra que la superación del capitalismo en tanto sociedad de clases. Tradicionalmente esta superación del capitalismo implicó una paradoja en la que se conjugaban el fin de la prehistoria y el inicio de una nueva historia de la humanidad. En este sentido, la dualidad de la posibilidad de un fin y un verdadero comienzo fue una respuesta a la noción hegeliana de derecha que establecía una clausura con el fin de la historia, que usualmente es reivindicado por los apologistas del capital como el mejor de los mundos posibles.

En otra afirmación famosa, que podemos encontrar en el Manifiesto Comunista, Marx y Engels sostuvieron que toda la historia existente hasta ese momento había sido la historia de la lucha de clases. Engels agregó un pie de página que reflexivamente especificaba “toda la historia escrita”. De aquí podríamos inferir que Engels se refería a la historia de la civilización. La historia de la lucha de clases no pertenecía, por ejemplo, a la historia humana o a la vida social previa a la formación de las clases sociales, al tiempo del supuesto “comunismo primitivo”. Más tarde, en 1942 (en sus ‘Reflexiones sobre la teoría de clases’), Adorno se apoyaba en la obra de Benjamin (las ‘Tesis sobre la filosofía de la historia”, 1940) para sostener que tal concepción de Marx y Engels de toda la historia como historia de la lucha de clases era en realidad una crítica de toda la historia, una crítica de la historia misma.

La pregunta que se nos plantea entonces es: de qué modo la crítica de la historia importa en relación con la crítica del capital? El problema de responder esta pregunta en términos del capitalismo como un sistema cuyo rasgo primario es la explotación es que en este sentido el capitalismo no se distingue de otras formas sociales. Aquello que constituye al capital como una forma social peculiar diferente de todas las demás es la dominación social. Tal peculiaridad no puede reducirse a la explotación, sino que por lo contrario, la dominación social debe ser distinguida como diferente de la explotación en términos lógicos e históricos, estructurales y empíricos. La dominación social significa la dominación de la sociedad por parte del capital. Este es el carácter nuevo del capital en la historia de la civilización, las formas sociales previas conocieron la dominación social directa de ciertos grupos sociales sobre otros. Sin embargo, esas formas de dominación nunca implicaron una dinámica social a la que estuviera sujeta la sociedad como un todo que involucra al conjunto de cada uno de los grupos sociales en todos sus aspectos.

En nuestro análisis comparativo de la historia de la humanidad debemos marcar una primera línea de demarcación que comenzó hace unos diez mil años con los orígenes de la civilización y de la sociedad de clases. Es el momento en el cual se produjo la revolución agrícola de la era neolítica y la humanidad realizó una transición de las sociedades nómades dedicadas a la caza y la recolección hacia el sedentarismo agrícola. En ese momento el campesinado se convirtió en el modo predominante de vida para la mayor parte de la humanidad, y así siguió siendo durante la mayor parte de la historia subsecuente.

Hace unos pocos cientos de años atrás, sin embargo, se produjo otra transformación comparable en términos de la profundidad del cambio que implicó. Esta transformación ha arrasado con el modo de vida campesino empujando a masas humanas de todo el planeta a convertirse en trabajadores/as urbanos/as: asalariados/as que se abocan a la confección de manufacturas industriales. Hacia fines del siglo XVII y principios del XIX, cuando esta transformación histórica se consolidaba con la revolución industrial, ciertos aspectos de la era de la sociedad “burguesa” se manifestaron de un modo que dio a esta historia del surgimiento de la modernidad un nuevo carácter. En vez de ser un “fin de la historia” tal como el pensamiento burgués había sostenido hasta entonces, la vida social moderna entró en una fase de severa crisis que problematizó la transición del campesinado a una sociedad basada en vendedores de fuerza de trabajo. Y en este contexto es que Marx en el siglo XIX toma conciencia de que la sociedad burguesa, junto con todas sus categorías de subjetividad que incluyen la valorización del trabajo, no tendría sino un carácter transicional en sí misma. Que la meta de la humanidad podría no encontrarse en el individuo productivo de la teoría y práctica burguesa, sino que por lo contrario, esta sociedad podría incubar contradicciones que apuntaran más allá de ella misma y hacia un potencial de transformación cualitativa tal vez tan profunda como la que separó la vida campesina de la del proletariado urbano. Una transición que estaría a la altura de la profundidad del cambio que tuvo lugar con la llegada de la agricultura en el período de la revolución neolítica hace diez mil años, cuando este cambio acabó con la vida de caza y recolección para una parte significativa de la humanidad. Una transformación más profunda que la que tuvo lugar en la transición de la sociedad tradicional a la moderna.

En el seno de la sociedad burguesa moderna que se consolidaba hacia el siglo XVIII, un nuevo fenómeno histórico sin precedentes se manifestaba en la vida política: la “izquierda”. Si bien es cierto que la disputa de valores siempre existió a lo largo de la historia, tal disputa nunca se formuló en términos de “progreso” histórico tal como lo formuló por primera vez la izquierda que convirtió a esta idea en su sello distintivo.

La Revolución Industrial de los inicios del siglo XIX, la introducción de la maquinaria, fue acompañada por el desarrollo de utopías socialistas optimistas y entusiastas que eran resultado de nuevos desarrollos que apuntaban hacia posibilidades fantásticas expresadas por la imaginación de Fourier y Saint-Simón entre otros.

Marx entendió la sociedad del “derecho burgués” y la “propiedad privada” como una formación que ya descansaba en la constitución social del trabajo como mediador del cual se derivaba la propiedad privada. En este marco Marx se preguntó si la trayectoria de esta sociedad desde la revuelta del Tercer Estado y la era de la manufactura en el siglo XVIII hasta la era de la Revolución Industrial en el siglo XIX no indicaba ya en potencia la posibilidad de un desarrollo ulterior.

En el seno de las transformaciones sociales dramáticas que recorrieron el siglo XIX, Marx escribió en el Manifiesto Comunista que “todo lo sólido se desvanece en el aire”. Ya en 1843 Marx pronosticaba la futura virtual proletarización de la sociedad y se preguntaba si era posible y bajo qué condiciones la humanidad devenida proletariado podría liberarse a sí misma de tal condición, si era posible que el proletariado “trascendiera” su propia existencia “aboliéndose a sí mismo”. En los Manuscritos de 1844, Marx reconocía que el socialismo (de Proudhon y otros/as) era en sí mismo un síntoma del capital: el trabajo proletario era constitutivo del capital, y por tanto su política era una expresión de cómo la sociedad articulada por el capital podía revelarse a sí misma como una forma social transicional que apuntara a su propia superación. Este era el punto de partida fundamental de Marx, la idea de que la proletarización era un problema social sustantivo. No un problema que meramente pusiera en jaque los intereses de la burguesía, sino una cuestión social de implicancias más bastas. La proletarización del conjunto de la sociedad no implicaba la superación del capital sino más bien su realización más completa. Y esa forma más desarrollada del capital contenida en la proletarización de la sociedad en su conjunto apuntaba más allá de sí misma. Fue en este marco que la filosofía izquierdista de la historia nació. Marx no era un socialista o un comunista sino más bien un pensador que se había propuesto comprender el significado del surgimiento del socialismo proletario en el seno de la historia. Marx no era ni el mejor ni el más consistente de los socialistas radicales, sino el más histórico, y por tanto, el que mayor autoconciencia había logrado. Marx entendió el término socialismo “científico” en el sentido de una forma de conocimiento que fuera autoconsciente de sus propias condiciones de posibilidad.

Desde una perspectiva hegeliana o marxista, la clarificación de la especificidad del moderno problema de la libertad social no se deduce sociológicamente, ya sea en términos de clase socioeconómica o en términos de un principio colectivista que esté por encima de lo individual, etc. Por el contrario, la libertad social solo puede entenderse como un problema de conciencia, específicamente, de conciencia histórica.

Desde que Marx planteó esta nueva mirada, fue la conciencia de la historia y de su potencial y posibilidades lo que distinguió a la izquierda de la derecha, por más utópica o confusa que esa perspectiva izquierdista pudiera llegar a ser. La lucha contra la opresión devino un factor secundario, dado que la derecha moderna también plantea un programa de abolición de la opresión. La derecha no representa al pasado sino más bien a la clausura de las potencialidades contenidas en el presente.

En este sentido, el factor fundamental de regresión de las posibilidades de la izquierda hoy, tanto en el plano de la teoría como en el de la práctica, está relacionado con el modo en que esta ha abandonado la conciencia histórica, y en cambio favorece la inmediatez de las luchas contra la opresión.

La crítica marxista del socialismo sintomático que iba desde Proudhon, Lassalle, Bakunin y otros/as hasta la de sus seguidores/as en el nuevo Partido Socialdemócrata Alemán en el Programa de Gotha (que luego se plasmaría de modo similar en el cuestionamiento engelsiano del Programa de Erfurt), tenía como blanco mantener la conciencia histórica del horizonte de posibilidades que abría una sociedad post-capitalista y post-proletaria.

Desafortunadamente, ya en vida misma de Marx, la forma de la política que pretendía inspirar no siempre alcanzó el umbral de su crucial conciencia de la historia. Una cuota importante de la regresión ha tenido lugar en el nombre mismo del “Marxismo”. A lo largo de la historia del marxismo se ha repetido una tragedia. Se trata de un problema que se manifestó desde las disputas contra el anarquismo en la primera internacional a las disputas en la Segunda internacional, las rupturas que tuvieron lugar con el surgimiento de la tercera internacional liderada por el bolchevismo, y finalmente el ascenso del trotskismo y de la cuarta. Retrospectivamente podríamos decir que existieron luchas abrumadoramente trágicas por preservar y recuperar algo del punto de partida inicial del socialismo proletario.

En la segunda mitad del siglo XX el carácter de la regresión ha adquirido tal magnitud y se halla tan distante de la autoconciencia marxista original que el marxismo en si mismo ha devenido una ideología positiva de la sociedad industrial, y el potencial de la sociedad post-capitalista ha sido oscurecido, encontrando una expresión por demás obtusa, en varias ideologías utópicas. En las últimas décadas la hegemonía de las ideologías anarquistas y el rechazo romántico de la modernidad dominan casi por completo el panorama político.

Incluso más allá del punto de crisis y de regresión respecto de la autoconciencia marxista original, la izquierda misma, que surgió antes de los intentos de Hegel y Marx por teorizar su importancia histórica, está virtualmente desaparecida. En la actualidad resulta sumamente difícil distinguir entre respuestas al capital desde ideologías conservadoras y reaccionarias por un lado y progresistas y emancipadoras por otro. Tal confusión es inseparable de la bancarrota y desaparición del movimiento social iniciado por el socialismo proletario al que Marx había intentado otorgar una autoconciencia más adecuada y provocativa en el momento de su surgimiento en el siglo XIX.

Paradójicamente, tal como Lukács, siguiendo a Luxemburg y Lenin, ya notó cerca de cien años atrás, mientras que la posibilidad de superar al capitalismo en ciertos sentidos se encuentra objetivamente más cercana, en otros sentidos parece haber retrocedido infinitamente más allá del horizonte de posibilidades. Debemos recordar la reflexión de Luxemburgo sobre el oportunismo que siempre nos amenaza, no en términos de traición política o de caída en el pecado, sino más bien en términos de la manifestación de un miedo muy real que subyace a la más mínima manifestación de los riesgos involucrados en el intento de mover el mundo más allá del capital.

Aún peor – y en los tiempos que corren esto resulta previo a cualquier peligro de ‘oportunismo’ – con la extrema si no completa desintegración de nuestra capacidad para aprehender y transformar el capital a través de la política de clase ha llegado nuestra imposibilidad de incluso reconocer y entender nuestra realidad social en sus sentidos más básicos. No sufrimos meramente de oportunismo sino de una desorientación aún más primaria. Hoy no nos enfrentamos al problema de cambiar el mundo, sino de entenderlo.

Por otro lado, ¿acercándonos al marxismo socialista, estamos lidiando con una ‘utopía’? Y si ese fuera el caso, ¿cómo encarar la cuestión? ¿Cuál es la importancia de nuestro sentido ‘utópico’ del potencial humano más allá del capital y del trabajo proletario? ¿Se trata de un mero sueño? Marx comenzó con el socialismo utópico y terminó con la ideología política moderna más espectacular aunque fallida: el ‘socialismo científico’. Al mismo tiempo, Marx nos dio un sentido agudo e incisivo del marco crítico necesario para entender las razones por las cuales los últimos dos cientos años han sido, de lejos, los más tumultuosos y transformativos. Incluso cuando al mismo tiempo estos dos siglos han sido también la época más destructiva de la civilización humana. Marx nos ofrece un marco para entender por qué este período prometió tanto cuando en realidad nos desilusionó amargamente. Los últimos dos siglos han visto más cambios que los milenios previos. Marx intentó comprender las razones de esta transformación vertiginosa. Otros intentos de explicar este fenómeno no pudieron ver la diferencia y han tratado de reasimilar la historia moderna a la historia tradicional que existió en el pasado (por ejemplo, es el caso de las ilusiones postmodernas de un medievalismo sin fin: ver el libro de Bruno Latour, Nunca hemos sido modernos, 1993).

¿Qué significaría entender el conjunto del proyecto marxiano como, primero y principal, un reconocimiento de que la modernidad como un todo no es más que una patología de transición de la sociedad de clases que emergió con la agricultura diez mil años atrás a través del surgimiento de la forma de la mercancía como mediación social que nos condujo hacia el presente globalizado del capital y que puede conducirnos hacia una forma de humanidad que podría situarse más allá de todo esto?

Marx nos hizo encarar la autoconciencia de una obscura y misteriosa tarea histórica, que solo puede clarificarse teóricamente mediante la práctica transformadora, la práctica del socialismo proletario. Pero esta tarea ha sido abandonada en favor de lo que esencialmente son luchas que reconstituyen al capital, que intentan lidiar con la vicisitudes de la dinámica de la historia moderna. Esta reasimilación del marxismo en la ideología característica de la revuelta del Tercer Estado implica una pérdida del verdadero horizonte de posibilidades que posibilitó la teoría de Marx y le dio a su proyecto relevancia y urgencia.

¿Podemos seguir a Marx y a los/as mejores representantes revolucionarios/as marxistas que fueron consecuentes con su proyecto en el reconocimiento de que las formas de descontento en una sociedad patológica como la que habitamos son sintomáticas del mismo problema contra el que se alzan? ¿Podemos evitar la actitud post-capitalista prematura y el utopismo reaccionario más bajo que subyace a la presente muerte de la izquierda en la teoría y la práctica y en cambio llevar a cabo las tareas que nos ha legado la historia? ¿Podemos reconocer el aliento y profundidad del problema que yace ante nosotros/as y que pretendemos resolver sin retroceder a las ilusiones del pensamiento y la ideología del hecho consumado? ¿Caeremos en la apología del impulso que empuja directamente contra la tarea que deberíamos emprender a expensas de llegar a conocer lo que yace más allá de las trampas del sufrimiento presente?

Necesitamos una conciencia aguda y urgente de nuestra época histórica tanto como del efímero ahora en el que nos encontramos. Debemos preguntarnos cuál es la característica del momento presente que podría conllevar la posibilidad de recuperar una conciencia social y política marxista viable, y cómo es que podemos avanzar en el entendido de esa recuperación.

El problema es que la patología de nuestra sociedad moderna mediada por el capital, de la forma proletaria de vida social y sus objetivaciones, de las nuevas formas de humanidad cuyas posibilidades abre, las cuales no tienen precedentes en la historia, se vuelve cada vez peor a medida que se retrasa la oportunidad de los pasos posibles y necesarios hacia los niveles que siguen en la lucha por la libertad.

La patología crece y empeora, no meramente porque se profundicen las formas de destrucción de la humanidad, que son aterradoras, sino también, y quizás esto es aún más importante – y aterrador – en el manifiesto empeoramiento de las condiciones sociales necesaria para que se recuperen las capacidades práctico-políticas de la izquierda, y de nuestra creciente incapacidad de comprensión. Si ha habido una crisis y evacuación de pensamiento marxista, ha sido porque su contexto fundamental y punto de partida, su conciencia del gran momento histórico, la posibilidad de una transformación epocal, ha sido olvidada, mientras que nosotro/as no hemos escapado al momento, sino que solo hemos perdido vista de las necesidades y posibilidades. Cualquier política emancipadora futura debe volver a ganar esta conciencia de la naturaleza transicional de la modernidad capitalista y de las razones por la que pagamos un precio muy alto por no reconocer tal transición. | P

Chris Cutrone

[English]  [Español]  [Deutsch]

 

Το κείμενο αυτό είναι μια ομιλία που δόθηκε στο δημόσιο φόρουμ της Marxist-Humanist Committee για την «Κρίση της μαρξιστικής σκέψης» το οποίο φιλοξενήθηκε στο Σικάγο από την Platypus Affiliated Society, την Παρασκευή, 25/7/2008.

Θέλω να μιλήσω για το νόημα της ιστορίας για κάθε Αριστερά που δηλώνει μαρξιστική.

Εμείς στην οργάνωση Πλατύπους εστιάζουμε στην ιστορία της Αριστεράς επειδή πιστεύουμε ότι η αφήγηση καθενός για την ιστορία αυτή είναι στην πραγματικότητα η θεωρία του για το παρόν. Είτε ρητά είτε όχι, σε κάθε σύλληψη της ιστορίας της Αριστεράς υπάρχει μια αποτίμηση για τον τρόπο κατάληξης στο παρόν. Εστιάζοντας στην ιστορία της Αριστεράς ή υιοθετώντας μια αριστεροκεντρική άποψη τής ιστορίας, υποθέτουμε ότι οι πιο σημαντικοί προσδιορισμοί του παρόντος είναι αποτέλεσμα όσων η Αριστερά ιστορικά έκανε ή απέτυχε να κάνει.

Για τους σκοπούς αυτής της ομιλίας θα εστιάσω στο ευρύτερο δυνατό πλαίσιο αυτών των ζητημάτων και προβλημάτων του κεφαλαίου στην ιστορία, στο ευρύτερο δυνατό συγκείμενο εντός του οποίου νομίζω ότι χρειάζεται κανείς να κατανοήσει τα προβλήματα που αντιμετωπίζει η Αριστερά, ιδιαίτερα μια υποτίθεται μαρξική Αριστερά.

Για παράδειγμα, δεν θα εστιάσω τόσο σε θέματα που μας ενδιαφέρουν στην ιστορία των ποικίλων φάσεων και σταδίων του ίδιου του κεφαλαίου, όπως ο ισχυρισμός μας ότι η δεκαετία του ’60 δεν αποτέλεσε κάποιο είδος προόδου, αλλά μια βαθιά οπισθοδρόμηση για την Αριστερά. Δεν θα διευκρινίσω την αποτίμησή μας για τον τρόπο με τον οποίο το παρόν υποφέρει από τουλάχιστον 3 γενιές αποσύνθεσης και οπισθοδρόμησης της Αριστεράς: η πρώτη, τη δεκαετία του ’30, ως τραγωδία∙ η δεύτερη, τη δεκαετία του ’60, ως φάρσα∙ και η πιο πρόσφατη, τη δεκαετία του ’90, ως αποστείρωση.

Αλλά θα επισημάνω πως, για μας, η αναγνώριση της οπισθοδρόμησης αυτής και η προσπάθεια να κατανοήσουμε τη σημασία και τις αιτίες της, είναι ίσως η σημαντικότερη αφετηρία. Το θέμα αυτής της ομιλίας είναι η πιο θεμελιώδης υπόθεση που διαμορφώνει την κατανόησή μας αυτής της οπισθοδρόμησης.

Για λόγους συντομίας, δεν θα παραπέμπω ρητά, αλλά θα ήθελα να δηλώσω το χρέος μου για την ακόλουθη πραγμάτευση μιας δυνητικής μαρξικής φιλοσοφίας της ιστορίας, πέρα από τους ίδιους τους Μαρξ και Ένγκελς, τη Ρόζα Λούξεμπουργκ, και τους Λένιν και Τρότσκι, στους Γκέοργκ Λούκατς, Καρλ Κορς, Βάλτερ Μπένγιαμιν, Τέοντορ Αντόρνο και, τελευταίο μα όχι λιγότερο σημαντικό, στον μελετητή του Μαρξ, Μοΐσε Ποστόουν. Και επιπλέον θα βρίσκομαι σε διάλογο, μέσω αυτών των συγγραφέων, με τον Χέγκελ, που διέκρινε τη φιλοσοφική ιστορία ως την ιστορία της ανάπτυξης της ελευθερίας.— Για τον Χέγκελ, η ιστορία έχει νόημα μονάχα στο βαθμό που αποτελεί την ιστορία της ελευθερίας.

Το κεφάλαιο είναι εντελώς πρωτοφανές στην ιστορία της ανθρωπότητας, συνεπώς κάθε αγώνας για χειραφέτηση πέραν του κεφαλαίου είναι επίσης πρωτοφανής. Αν και υπάρχει σύνδεση μεταξύ της καινοφανούς φύσης της ανάδυσης του κεφαλαίου στην ιστορία και του αγώνα να ξεπεραστεί, αυτή η σύνδεση μπορεί να είναι επίσης άκρως παραπλανητική, οδηγώντας σε μία ψευδή συμμετρία μεταξύ της μετάβασης σε διαφορετικές περιόδους των μετασχηματισμών του νεώτερου κεφαλαίου (της μετάβασης εντός τους και μεταξύ τους) και της δυνητικής μετάβασης πέρα απ’ το κεφάλαιο. Η εξέγερση της Τρίτης Τάξης (Third Estate) που εγκαινίασε μια συνεχώς εξελίσιμη και πάντοτε ανεξάντλητη νεώτερη ιστορία αστικο-δημοκρατικών επαναστάσεων, αποτελεί τόσο το έδαφος για μια μαρξική προοπτική, όσο και το έδαφος που προέρχεται από μια μαρξική προοπτική: αποτελεί τώρα τη δυνητικά ιστορικά απαρχαιωμένη κοινωνική μορφή πολιτικής από την οποία η προλεταριακή σοσιαλιστική πολιτική επιχειρεί να αναχωρήσει, να πάει παραπέρα.

Ο Χέγκελ, ως ο φιλόσοφος της εποχής τής τελευταίας των μεγάλων αστικο-δημοκρατικών επαναστάσεων που σημάδεψαν την ανάδυση του σύγχρονου κεφαλαίου, της μεγάλης Γαλλικής Επανάστασης του 1789, ήταν για τον λόγο αυτό ένας θεωρητικός της εξέγερσης της Τρίτης Τάξης. Ο Μαρξ, που ακολούθησε αργότερα, μετά το ξεκίνημα της Βιομηχανικής Επανάστασης του 19ου αιώνα, αντιμετώπισε προβλήματα που δεν αντιμετώπισε ο Χέγκελ.

Έχει συχνά διατυπωθεί από μαρξιστές, αλλά όχι πλήρως κατανοηθεί, ότι ο Μαρξ αναγνώριζε την ιστορική αποστολή του ταξικά συνειδητοποιημένου προλεταριάτου, να ξεπεράσει τον καπιταλισμό κι έτσι να καταργήσει την ταξική κοινωνία. Παραδοσιακά αυτό σήμαινε, κατά παράδοξο τρόπο εντούτοις, είτε το τέλος της προϊστορίας, είτε την απαρχή της αληθινής ιστορίας της ανθρωπότητας.— Κατά μία έννοια, αυτή η διττότητα της δυνατότητας ενός τέλους και μιας αληθινής απαρχής, ήταν μια απάντηση στη δεξιά εγελιανή έννοια του τέλους της ιστορίας, αυτό που υποτίθεται από τους απολογητές του κεφαλαίου ως ο καλύτερος δυνατός κόσμος.

Οι Μαρξ και Ένγκελς, στο Κομμουνιστικό Μανιφέστο, διακήρυξαν τη διάσημη φράση πως όλη η μέχρι τώρα ιστορία υπήρξε ιστορία ταξικών αγώνων∙ ο Ένγκελς πρόσθεσε μια έξυπνη υποσημείωση που διευκρίνιζει: «όλη η καταγεγραμμένη ιστορία». Μπορούμε να συνάγουμε απ’ αυτό πως ο Ένγκελς εννοούσε την ιστορία του πολιτισμού∙ η ιστορία ως ταξική πάλη δεν προσιδιάζει, για παράδειγμα, στην ανθρώπινη ιστορία ή κοινωνική ζωή πριν τον σχηματισμό των τάξεων, την εποχή του υποτιθέμενου «πρωτόγονου κομμουνισμού». Αργότερα, το 1942 (στο δοκίμιο «Στοχασμοί για την ταξική θεωρία»), ο Αντόρνο, ακολουθώντας τον Μπένγιαμιν (στις «Θέσεις για τη φιλοσοφία της ιστορίας», του 1940), έγραψε πως αυτή η σύλληψη όλης της ιστορίας, από τους Μαρξ και Ένγκελς, ως ιστορίας ταξικών αγώνων, ήταν στην πραγματικότητα μια κριτική όλης της ιστορίας, μια κριτική της ίδιας της ιστορίας.

Επομένως, με ποιο τρόπο η κριτική της ιστορίας έχει σημασία για την κριτική του κεφαλαίου; Το πρόβλημα με την τετριμμένη θεώρηση του καπιταλισμού ως πρωτίστως ενός προβλήματος εκμετάλλευσης είναι ότι σ’ αυτή του τη διάσταση το κεφάλαιο αποτυγχάνει να διακρίνει τον εαυτό του από άλλες μορφές πολιτισμού. Αυτό που είναι καινούριο στο κεφάλαιο είναι η κοινωνική κυριαρχία, η οποία πρέπει να διακρίνεται τόσο λογικά όσο και ιστορικά, δομικά και εμπειρικά, από την εκμετάλλευση, στην οποία δεν είναι αναγώγιμη. Κοινωνική κυριαρχία σημαίνει την κυριαρχία του κεφαλαίου επί της κοινωνίας. Αυτό είναι καινοφανές σχετικά με το κεφάλαιο στην ιστορία του πολιτισμού∙ πρότερες μορφές πολιτισμού γνώριζαν τη φανερή κυριαρχία μερικών κοινωνικών ομάδων επί κάποιων άλλων, αλλά δεν γνώριζαν, όπως ο Μαρξ αναγνώρισε στο κεφάλαιο, μια κοινωνική δυναμική στην οποία υπάγονται όλες οι κοινωνικές ομάδες —όλες οι πτυχές της κοινωνίας στο σύνολό της.

Πρέπει λοιπόν να χαράξουμε αρχικά μια διαχωριστική γραμμή περίπου 10.000 χρόνια πριν, με τις απαρχές του πολιτισμού και της ταξικής κοινωνίας, όταν έλαβε χώρα η μεγάλη γεωργική επανάσταση της νεολιθικής εποχής, και τα ανθρώπινα όντα από νομάδες κυνηγοί – τροφοσυλλέκτες έγιναν εγκατεστημένοι καλλιεργητές της γης. Η επικρατούσα μορφή ζωής για την ανθρωπότητα μετέβη από τον κυνηγό-τροφοσυλλέκτη στον χωρικό, κι έτσι παρέμεινε για το μεγαλύτερο μέρος της ακόλουθης ιστορίας.

Εντούτοις, αρκετές εκατοντάδες χρόνια πριν, ένας παρόμοιος βαθύς μετασχηματισμός ξεκίνησε κατά τον οποίο ο κυρίαρχος τρόπος ζωής μετέβη από τον γεωργό χωρικό στον εργαζόμενο του άστεως: μισθωτό, κατασκευαστή και βιομηχανικού παραγωγού.

Εγγύτερα, με τη Βιομηχανική Επανάσταση κατά τα τέλη του 18ου και τις αρχές του 19ου αιώνα, κάποιες πτυχές αυτής της «αστικής» εποχής του πολιτισμού και της κοινωνίας εκδηλώθηκαν και έριξαν νέο φως σ’ αυτή την ιστορία ανάδυσης της νεωτερικότητας. Αντί για το «τέλος της ιστορίας», όπως νόμιζαν μέχρι εκείνη την εποχή οι αστοί στοχαστές, η νεώτερη κοινωνική ζωή εισήλθε σε οξεία κρίση που προβληματικοποίησε θεμελιωδώς τη μετάβαση στην εδραιωμένη στον εργάτη κοινωνία, από την εδραιωμένη στον χωρικό.

Τον 19ο αιώνα, με τον Μαρξ, ήρθε η αντίληψη ότι η αστική κοινωνία, μαζί με όλες τις κατηγορίες της περί υποκειμενικότητας, της αξιοποίησης της εργασίας συμπεριλαμβανομένης, μπορεί και η ίδια να είναι μεταβατική, ότι ο τελικός στόχος της ανθρωπότητας ενδέχεται να μη βρίσκεται στο παραγωγικό άτομο της αστικής θεωρίας και πράξης, αλλά ότι αυτή η κοινωνία ενδέχεται να παραπέμπει πέρα από τον εαυτό της, προς έναν δυνητικό ποιοτικό μετασχηματισμό, τουλάχιστον τόσο βαθύ όσο αυτόν που διαχώρισε τον τρόπο ζωής του χωρικού απ’ αυτόν του «προλετάριου» του άστεως.  Πράγματι, προς μία μετάβαση περισσότερο της τάξεως βαθύτητας της νεολιθικής επανάστασης στη γεωργία που τερμάτισε την κυνηγετική – τροφοσυλλεκτική κοινωνία 10.000 χρόνια πριν, βαθύτερη απ΄αυτή που διαχώρισε τη νεώτερη από την παραδοσιακή κοινωνία.

Την ίδια στιγμή που αυτή η νεώτερη, αστική κοινωνία, εξελισσόμενη με υψηλή ταχύτητα μέχρι τα τέλη του 18ου αιώνα, περιήλθε σε κρίση, ένα καινούργιο, άνευ προηγουμένου ιστορικό φαινόμενο εκδηλώθηκε στην πολιτική ζωή: η «Αριστερά». — Ενώ πιο πρώιμες μορφές πολιτικής σίγουρα αμφισβητούσαν αξίες, αυτό δεν το έκαναν σε όρους ιστορικής «προόδου», η οποία έγινε το σήμα κατατεθέν της Αριστεράς.

Η Βιομηχανική Επανάσταση των αρχών του 19ου αιώνα, η εισαγωγή της μηχανικής παραγωγής, συνοδεύτηκε από τις αισιόδοξες και ενθουσιώδεις σοσιαλιστικές ουτοπίες που ενέπνεαν αυτές οι νέες εξελίξεις, αναδεικνύοντας φανταστικές δυνατότητες που εξέφρασε η φαντασία των Φουριέ και Σαιν Σιμόν, μεταξύ άλλων.

Ο Μαρξ έβλεπε την κοινωνία του «αστικού δικαίου» και της «ιδιωτικής ιδιοκτησίας» ως πράγματι ήδη βασισμένη στην κοινωνική συγκρότηση και διαμεσολάβηση της εργασίας, από την οποία αντλούνταν η ιδιωτική ιδιοκτησία, και έθεσε το ερώτημα κατά πόσο η τροχιά αυτής της κοινωνίας, από την εξέγερση της Τρίτης Τάξης και την εποχή της μανιφακτούρας τον 18ο αιώνα στη Βιομηχανική Επανάσταση του 19ου αιώνα, υποδείκνυε τη δυνατότητα μίας περαιτέρω ανάπτυξης.

Στη μέση των δραματικών κοινωνικών μετασχηματισμών του 19ου αιώνα στους οποίους, όπως το έθεσε ο Μαρξ στο Μανιφέστο, «κάθε τι συμπαγές εξατμίζεται», ήδη από το 1843, ο Μαρξ προέβλεψε και αντιμετώπισε τη μελλοντική κατ’ουσίαν προλεταριοποίηση της κοινωνίας, και αναρωτήθηκε εάν και πώς η ανθρωπότητα σε προλεταριακή μορφή θα μπορούσε να απελευθερώσει τον εαυτό της απ’ αυτή την κατάσταση, εάν και πώς, και με ποιά αναγκαιότητα το προλεταριάτο θα «υπερέβαινε» και θα «καταργούσε τον εαυτό του». Ήδη πρώιμα, στα Χειρόγραφα του 1844, ο Μαρξ αναγνώρισε ότι ο σοσιαλισμός (του Προυντόν κ.α.) ήταν και ο ίδιος συμπτωματικός του κεφαλαίου: η προλεταριακή εργασία συγκροτούσε το κεφάλαιο κι έτσι η πολιτική της ήταν συμπτωματική του τρόπου με τον οποίο η κοινωνία που καθοριζόταν απ’ το κεφάλαιο θα μπορούσε να αποκαλυφθεί ως μεταβατική, παραπέμποντας πέρα απ’ αυτήν.— Αυτή ήταν η πιο θεμελιώδης αφετηρία του Μαρξ, ότι η προλεταριοποίηση ήταν ένα ουσιώδες κοινωνικό πρόβλημα και όχι απλώς σχετικό με την αστική τάξη, και ότι η προλεταριοποίηση της κοινωνίας δεν συνιστούσε το ξεπέρασμα του κεφαλαίου αλλά την πλήρη πραγμάτωσή του, και ότι αυτή — η προλεταριοποιημένη κοινωνία του κεφαλαίου — παρέπεμπε πέραν του εαυτού της.

Έτσι, με τον Μαρξ γεννήθηκε η φιλοσοφία της ιστορίας της Αριστεράς. Διότι ο Μαρξ δεν ήταν τόσο ένα σοσιαλιστής ή κομμουνιστής όσο ένας στοχαστής που ανέθεσε στον εαυτό του το καθήκον της κατανόησης του νοήματος της ανάδυσης του προλεταριακού σοσιαλισμού στην ιστορία. Ο Μαρξ δεν ήταν απλά ο καλύτερος ή ο πιο συνεπής ή ριζοσπάστης σοσιαλιστής, αλλά μάλλον ο πιο ιστορικά, και συνεπώς κριτικά, έχων αυτεπίγνωση. Με τον «επιστημονικό» σοσιαλισμό ο Μαρξ αντιλήφθηκε πως επεξεργαζόταν μία μορφή γνώσης που έχει επίγνωση των δικών της συνθηκών δυνατότητας.

Για μία εγελιανή και μαρξική αποσαφήνιση της εξειδίκευσης του νεώτερου προβλήματος της κοινωνικής ελευθερίας γίνεται εντούτοις σαφές ότι η Αριστερά πρέπει να ορίσει τον εαυτό της όχι κοινωνιολογικά, επί των όρων είτε της κοινωνικο-οικονομικής τάξης είτε της αρχής του κολλεκτιβισμού επί του ατομικισμού κ.λπ., αλλά μάλλον ως θέμα συνείδησης, και ειδικότερα ιστορικής συνείδησης.

Διότι, με αφετηρία τον Μαρξ, είναι η συνείδηση της ιστορίας και του ιστορικού δυναμικού και δυνατοτήτων, όσο ουτοπικές και αμυδρές κι αν εμφανίζονται, που διακρίνει την Αριστερά από τη Δεξιά, όχι ο αγώνας ενάντια στην καταπίεση — τον οποίο επικαλείται επίσης η σύγχρονη Δεξιά. Η Δεξιά δεν εκπροσωπεί το παρελθόν αλλά μάλλον τον αποκλεισμό των δυνατοτήτων του παρόντος.

Για τον λόγο αυτό έχει σημασία για μας να αναγνωρίσουμε το δυνάμει και το γεγονός της οπισθοδρόμησης που υπέφεραν οι δυνατότητες της Αριστεράς στη θεωρία και πράξη, ως αποτέλεσμα της εγκατάλειψης της ιστορικής συνείδησης για χάρη της αμεσότητας των αγώνων ενάντια στην καταπίεση.

Η κριτική του Μαρξ στον συμπτωματικό σοσιαλισμό, από τους Προυντόν, Λασάλ, Μπακούνιν κ.α. μέχρι τους ίδιους τους οπαδούς του στο νέο γερμανικό Σοσιαλδημοκρατικό Κόμμα και το πρόγραμμά του, της Γκότα (όπως επίσης και η επακόλουθη κριτική του Ένγκελς στο πρόγραμμα της Ερφούρτης), στόχευε στη διατήρηση του μαρξικού οράματος που αντιστοιχούσε στον ορίζοντα της δυνατότητας μίας μετακαπιταλιστικής και μεταπρολεταριακής κοινωνίας.

Δυστυχώς, ακόμα και όσο ζούσε ο Μαρξ, η μορφή πολιτικής που επιδίωκε να εμπνεύσει άρχισε να πέφτει πολύ κάτω από το επίπεδο αυτής της κριτικά σημαντικής συνείδησης της ιστορίας. Και η μεγάλη πλειοψηφία αυτής της οπισθοδρόμησης έλαβε χώρα ακριβώς στο όνομα του «μαρξισμού». Καθ’ όλη τη διάρκεια της ιστορίας του μαρξισμού, από τις διενέξεις με τους αναρχικούς στην 1η Διεθνή Ένωση των Εργατών, τις διενέξεις στη 2η Σοσιαλιστική Διεθνή, μέχρι τις επακόλουθες ρήξεις στο μαρξιστικό κίνημα των εργατών με την καθοδηγούμενη από τους μπολσεβίκους Τρίτη Κομμουνιστική Διεθνή και την τροτσκιστική Τέταρτη Διεθνή, έλαβε χώρα ένας, κάποιες φορές ηρωικός αλλά, αναδρομικά, σε μεγάλο βαθμό τραγικός αγώνας για τη διατήρηση ή την ανάκτηση κάποιου στοιχείου της αρχικής μαρξικής αφετηρίας για τον σύγχρονο προλεταριακό σοσιαλισμό.

Στο δεύτερο μισό του 20ού αιώνα, οι εξελίξεις οπισθοδρόμησαν τόσο πολύ πίσω από την αρχική μαρξιστική αυτοσυνείδηση ώστε ο ίδιος ο μαρξισμός έγινε μία καταφατική ιδεολογία της βιομηχανικής κοινωνίας και το κατώφλι της μετακαπιταλιστικής κοινωνίας συσκοτίστηκε, βρίσκοντας μόνο αμβλεία έκφραση στις ποικίλες επανερχόμενες ουτοπικές ιδεολογίες και, τελικά, στην πιο πρόσφατη περίοδο, στην ηγεμονία «αναρχικών» ιδεολογιών και ρομαντικών απορρίψεων της νεωτερικότητας.

Όμως, πέρα απ’ αυτή την κρίση και το πέρασμα στη λήθη μιας συγκεκριμένα μαρξικής προσέγγισης, η ίδια η «Αριστερά», η οποία αναδύθηκε προτού οι Χέγκελ και Μαρξ αποπειραθούν να φιλοσοφήσουν την ιστορική της σημασία, έχει κατ’ ουσίαν αφανισθεί. Η παρούσα ανικανότητα διάκρισης των συντηρητικών-αντιδραστικών από τις προοδευτικές-χειραφετητικές απαντήσεις στα προβλήματα της διεπόμενης από το κεφάλαιο κοινωνίας, είναι αδιαχώριστη από την παρακμή και εξαφάνιση του κοινωνικού κινήματος του προλεταριακού σοσιαλισμού για το οποίο ο Μαρξ είχε επιδιώξει να παρέχει μία πιο επαρκή και προκλητική αυτοσυνείδηση την εποχή της ανάδυσής του, τον 19ο αιώνα.

Παραδόξως, όπως ήδη έδειξε ο Λούκατς, σχεδόν έναν αιώνα πριν, ακολουθώντας τη Λούξεμπουργκ και τον Λένιν, ενώ η φαινόμενη δυνατότητα ξεπεράσματος του κεφαλαίου προσεγγίζεται σε ορισμένα σημεία, υπό μία άλλη έννοια φαίνεται να υποχωρεί αχανώς πέρα από τον ορίζοντα της δυνατότητας. Μπορούμε να ακολουθήσουμε την πρώιμη διαπίστωση της Λούξεμπουργκ περί του οπορτουνισμού που πάντα μας απειλεί, όχι σαν ένα είδος ξεπουλήματος ή πτώσης από τη δόξα, αλλά σαν την εκδήλωση του πολύ πραγματικού φόβου που συνοδεύει την ανατέλλουσα επίγνωση των σοβαρών κινδύνων που συνεπάγεται η προσπάθεια της θεμελιώδους κίνησης του κόσμου πέρα απ’ το κεφάλαιο;

Το χειρότερο — που, προς το παρόν, προηγείται κάθε κινδύνου «οπορτουνισμού» — με την ακραία εκτράχυνση, αν όχι απόλυτη αποσύνθεση, της ικανότητάς μας να αντιλαμβανόμαστε και να μετασχηματίζουμε το κεφάλαιο με την πολιτική της εργατικής τάξης, είναι η εκτράχυνση της ικανότητάς μας ακόμα και να αναγνωρίζουμε και να αντιλαμβανόμαστε, πόσο μάλλον να κατανοούμε επαρκώς, την κοινωνική μας πραγματικότητα. Δεν υποφέρουμε απλά από οπορτουνισμό αλλά μάλλον από έναν βασικότερο αποπροσανατολισμό. Σήμερα αντιμετωπίζουμε το πρόβλημα, όχι της αλλαγής του κόσμου αλλά, πιο θεμελιωδώς, της κατανόησής του.

Από την άλλη πλευρά, προσεγγίζοντας τον μαρξικό σοσιαλισμό, έχουμε να κάνουμε με μια «ουτοπία»; — Κι αν είναι έτσι, τι σημαίνει αυτό; Ποια είναι η σημασία της «ουτοπικής» μας αίσθησης του ανθρώπινου δυναμικού πέρα από το κεφάλαιο και την προλεταριακή εργασία; Είναι ένα απλό όνειρο;

Ο Μαρξ ξεκίνησε με τον ουτοπικό σοσιαλισμό και κατέληξε με την πιο επιδρώσα, αν και θεαματικά αποτυχημένη, σύγχρονη πολιτική ιδεολογία, τον «επιστημονικό σοσιαλισμό». Την ίδια στιγμή, ο Μαρξ μάς έδωσε ένα οξυδερκές και αιχμηρά κριτικό πλαίσιο για τη σύλληψη των λόγων για τους οποίους τα τελευταία 200 χρόνια υπήρξαν, μακράν, η πιο θυελλωδώς μετασχηματιστική αλλά επίσης καταστροφική εποχή του ανθρώπινου πολιτισμού, γιατί αυτή η περίοδος υποσχέθηκε τόσα πολλά κι όμως απογοήτευσε τόσο πικρά. Τα τελευταία 200 χρόνια είδαν περισσότερες και βαθύτερες αλλαγές, απ’ όσες είδαν προηγούμενες χιλιετίες. Ο Μαρξ προσπάθησε να συλλάβει τους λόγους γι’ αυτό. Άλλοι απέτυχαν να δουν τη διαφορά και προσπάθησαν να επαναφομοιώσουν τη σύγχρονη ιστορία πίσω στους προγόνους της (για παράδειγμα, στις μεταμοντερνιστικές ψευδαισθήσεις ενός αέναου μεσαιωνισμού: δες το βιβλίου του Bruno Latour, «Δεν υπήρξαμε ποτέ σύγχρονοι» - 1993).

Τί θα σήμαινε να πραγματευτούμε ολόκληρο το μαρξικό πρόταγμα ως, πρώτα και κύρια, την αναγνώριση της ιστορίας της νεωτερικότητας tout court ως μίας παθολογίας της μετάβασης, από τη γεωργική επανάσταση 10.000 χρόνια πριν και τους πολιτισμούς που βασίστηκαν σ’ έναν ουσιωδώς αγροτικό τρόπο ζωής, μέσω της ανάδυσης της εμπορευματικής μορφής της κοινωνικής διαμεσολάβησης, στον σημερινό παγκόσμιο πολιτισμό που κυριαρχείται από το κεφάλαιο, προς τη μορφή της ανθρωπότητας που μπορεί να εκτείνεται πέρα απ’ αυτό;

Με τον Μαρξ, ερχόμαστε αντιμέτωποι με την αυτοσυνείδηση ενός σκοτεινού και μυστηριώδους ιστορικού καθήκοντος που μπορεί να αποσαφηνιστεί περαιτέρω θεωρητικά μόνο διαμέσου της μετασχηματιστικής πρακτικής  — της πρακτικής του προλεταριακού σοσιαλισμού. Όμως αυτό το καθήκον έχει εγκαταλειφθεί για χάρη αγώνων που είναι ουσιωδώς ανασυγκροτητικοί για το κεφάλαιο, που προσπαθούν να αντιμετωπίσουν τις μεταστροφές της δυναμικής της σύγχρονης ιστορίας. Αλλά αυτή η επαναφομοίωση του μαρξισμού πίσω σε μια ιδεολογία χαρακτηριστική της εξέγερσης της Τρίτης Τάξης σημαίνει την απώλεια του αληθινού ορίζοντα της δυνατότητας που κινητοποίησε τον Μαρξ και έδωσε στο πρόταγμά του νόημα και επιτακτικότητα.

Μπορούμε να ακολουθήσουμε τον Μαρξ, και τους καλύτερους ιστορικά μαρξιστές που τον ακολούθησαν, στην αναγνώριση των ίδιων των μορφών δυσαρέσκειας της παθολογικής κοινωνίας στην οποία ζούμε ως συμπτωματικών και συνδεδεμένων με τα ίδια τα προβλήματα εναντίον των οποίων μαίνονται; Μπορούμε να αποφύγουμε τον πρόωρο μετακαπιταλισμό και τον κακό, αντιδραστικό ουτοπισμό που συνοδεύουν τον παρόντα θάνατο της Αριστεράς στη θεωρία και πράξη, και να διατηρήσουμε και να εκπληρώσουμε τα καθήκοντα που μας έχει παραδώσει η ιστορία; Μπορούμε να αναγνωρίσουμε την ευρύτητα και το βάθος του προβλήματος που επιχειρούμε να ξεπεράσουμε χωρίς να οπισθοχωρούμε σε ευσεβείς πόθους και ιδεολογική δοξολόγηση του τετελεσμένου γεγονότος, και σε απολογητική παρορμήσεων που μόνο φαινομενικά στρέφονται εναντίον του, εις βάρος αυτού που ενδέχεται να εκτείνεται πέρα από τις παγίδες των δεινών του παρόντος;

Χρειαζόμαστε επειγόντως μία οξυδερκή επίγνωση της ιστορικής μας εποχής καθώς και της προσωρινής μας στιγμής, τώρα, εντός της. — Πρέπει να αναρωτηθούμε για τα στοιχεία της τωρινής στιγμής που θα μπορούσαν να καταστήσουν βιώσιμη τη δυνατότητα ανάκτησης μίας μαρξικής κοινωνικής και πολιτικής συνείδησης, και για τον τρόπο με τον οποίο μπορούμε να την αναπτύξουμε ανακτώντας την.

Διότι η παθολογία της νεώτερης κοινωνίας μας η οποία διαμεσολαβείται από το κεφάλαιο, από την προλεταριακή μορφή της κοινωνικής ζωής και τις αυτο-αντικειμενικοποιήσεις της, τις νέες μορφές της ανθρωπότητας που καθιστά δυνατές, οι οποίες είναι εντελώς πρωτοφανείς στην ιστορία, η παθολογία αυτή μονάχα οξύνεται όσο περισσότερο καθυστερείται η υλοποίηση των πιθανών και αναγκαίων βημάτων στα επόμενα επίπεδα του αγώνα για την ελευθερία.

Η παθολογία οξύνεται, όχι απλά από την άποψη των ποικίλων μορφών καταστροφής της ανθρωπότητας, οι οποίες είναι τρομακτικές, αλλά επίσης, και ίσως πιο σημαντικά – και ενοχλητικά – στην έκδηλη επιδείνωση των κοινωνικών συνθηκών και ικανοτήτων πρακτικής πολιτικής στην Αριστερά, και στην επιδείνωση της θεωρητικής μας επίγνωσης αυτών. Αν έχει υπάρξει μια κρίση και απογύμνωση της μαρξικής σκέψης, έχει υπάρξει επειδή το πιο θεμελιώδες πλαίσιο και η αφετηρία της, η επίγνωση της σπουδαιότερης ιστορικής στιγμής της, η δυνατότητα μιας εποχικής μετάβασης, έχει λησμονηθεί, ενώ δεν έχουμε πάψει να μετέχουμε αυτής της στιγμής, παρά μόνο χάσαμε την επαφή με τις αναγκαιότητες και δυνατότητές της. Οποιαδήποτε μελλοντική χειραφετητική πολιτική πρέπει να ξαναβρεί αυτή την επίγνωση της μεταβατικής φύσης της καπιταλιστικής νεωτερικότητας, και των λόγων για τους οποίους πληρώνουμε ένα τόσο υπερβολικό τίμημα αποτυγχάνοντας να την αναγνωρίσουμε. |P