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Im 20.Jahrhundert tauchte immer wieder die Erinnerung an 1917 auf. Ob die Volksfront der 30er, die Kommunistische Revolution in China 1949 oder die Neue Linke der 60er, die Linke hat versucht, sich

Hosted by the Platypus Affiliated Society at the University of Tennessee (Knoxville) on April 26, 2017.

Speakers

Travis Donoho, Co-chair of the Knox area Democratic Socialists of America

Barbara Bridges, Chair of the Green Party (US) of Knoxville

Jason Dawsey, Lecturer of History at the University of Tennessee

Moderated by Matt Cavagrotti

 

Panel Description

Electoral politics are a longstanding problem for the U.S. left. In recent decades, a number of parties have formed as an alternative to the Democratic Party: the Labor Party, the Green Party, and now, the Justice Party. However, these parties risk becoming little more than networks of activists or pressure groups on the Democratic Party, and it still remains unclear whether a serious electoral challenge to the Democratic Party is possible.

Many progressives blame the “first-past-the-post” structure of U.S. elections, contra labour-friendly parliamentary systems; yet others insist that this procedural focus is misplaced. Leninists charge some quarters of the Left with misunderstanding the proper relationship of the party to the state; but for many, it remains unclear how State and Revolution bears upon the present. Most activists grant the desirability of a viable party to the left of the Democrats, but why exactly such a party is desirable-- to win reforms? to spread emancipatory consciousness?-- is contested as well.

These are old questions for the American left-- as old as Henry George, Daniel De Leon, and the 1930s American Labor Party, perhaps the high point of independent electoral politics in the U.S. This panel will investigate several contemporary approaches to electoral politics to draw out the theories that motivate Leftist third parties; it will also ask how the historical achievements and failures of third parties bear upon the present.

 

Questions

1. How does the present election represent an opportunity for the development of a third party?In what ways have Bernie Sanders, Donald Trump, Jill Stein, and Gary Johnson each helped develop a window of opportunity for a third party?

2. In what ways might these figures be responsible for miseducating, depoliticizing, or simply misdirecting potential allies?

3. What conditions would a Clinton or Trump administration produce for the left? How would each represent a challenge to the Left?

4. How might a third party avoid simply becoming either an instrument for pressuring the Democratic Party to the Left or a mere recruiting tool for activist and sectarian organizations? In other words: what are the practical and theoretical obstacles to the development of the Left beyond the default form of activity that have characterized it since the mid-20th century?

5. While we take for granted that a third party would have to distinguish itself from the two major parties, how could a third party attempt to draw from voters from both the Democrats and the Republicans?

6. The rise of progressivism and socialism in the late 19th/early 20th century defined every attempt at the development of a third party in the 20th century. How are progressive and socialist politics distinct and/or related? What role would each play in the development of a mass third party for the 21st century?

Hier findet ihr einen Audiomitschnitt zur Podiumsdiskussion "Politik der Arbeit" vom 31.01.2017 in Frankfurt am Main.
Aus gegebenem Anlass widmet sich diese Podiumsdiskussion dem Verständnis einiger grundlegender Fragen des Marxismus mit Blick auf ihre heutige Relevanz:
Traditionell unterstützten Marxisten und andere Teile der Linken auf politischer Ebene die Forderung der Arbeiter nach Reformen, welche ihre Lebensbedingungen verbessern sollten. Doch verstanden führende Persönlichkeiten der marxistischen Tradition wie Lenin, Luxemburg und Trotzki, dass solche Reformen zugleich die Krise des Kapitalismus vertieften, da sie seine immanenten Widersprüche zuspitzten.
So ist z.B. die Vollbeschäftigung eine – vom Standpunkt der Arbeiter – notwendige Forderung. Gleichzeitig aber wird das gesamte System der Beschäftigung gefährdet, welches unter Bedingungen kapitalistischer Produktion auf die Abschöpfung des Mehrwerts der verfügbaren Arbeitskraft angewiesen ist.
Um die Probleme und Ambiguitäten einer möglichen Politik der Arbeit herauszuschälen, lassen wir verschiedene linke Perspektiven zu Wort kommen. Diese Diskussion soll ein Klärungsversuch zentraler Fragen für eine neu konstituierte internationale marxistische Linke darstellen. Welches sind gegenwärtig theoretische und praktische Hindernisse einer solchen Linken, die durch die Politik der Arbeit die Befreiung der Arbeiterklasse anstreben würde?
Ist die Arbeiterklasse eine Identität neben anderen unterdrückten Identitäten? Gibt es heute eine Arbeiterklasse und muss diese sich selbst emanzipieren? Auf welchem Weg kann das erreicht werden? Welche Prinzipien zeichneten die Politik der Arbeit einst aus? Was ist das Verhältnis von Reform und Revolution?
Mit:
Thomas Seibert - Interventionistische Linke
Holger Marcks - unter_bau
Jonas - farbeRot
Heinz Klee - Arbeiterbund zum Wiederaufbau der KPD

In spite of many different political currents and tendencies, perhaps the most significant question informing the "Left" today is the issue of "political party.” Various "Left unity" initiatives have been taking place in the aftermath of the 2008 economic crisis and subsequent downturn, following Occupy Wall Street and the Arab Spring, alongside continuing "post-political" tendencies inherited from

Communist University took place August 13-20, 2011

http://cpgb.wordpress.com/

Goldsmiths, University of London
Raymont Hall
63 Wickham Road
London SE4 1LX


Platypus Affiliated Society members presented as follows:

Tuesday, August 16, 4:45PM-7PM
• Chris Cutrone, "Capital in history: Marxism and the modern philosophy of freedom" 

audio recording
Marx on "becoming" [PDF handout]

Friday, August 19, 10AM-12:30PM
• Spencer Leonard, "Marx's critique of political economy: proletarian socialism continuing the bourgeois revolution?"

audio recording

Recommended background readings:

Cutrone, "Capital in history: the need for a Marxian philosophy of history of the Left" (2008)

Cutrone, "The Marxist hypothesis: a response to Alain Badiou's 'communist hypothesis'" (2010)

Background reading compiled from recent engagements between the CPGB and Platypus can be found at: /wp-content/uploads/2011/08/macnairmike_platypuscritique_may-august2011_081111.pdf or /wp-content/uploads/2011/08/cpgbcontraplatypus081111.pdf


Facebook invitation at:

http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=121122331312799

June 20–24, 2011
Institute for the Humanities, University of Illinois at Chicago


Marxism and the bourgeois revolution

Spencer Leonard, "Marx’s critique of political economy: Proletarian socialism continuing the bourgeois revolution?"
Pamela Nogales, "Marx on the U.S. Civil War as the 2nd American Revolution"
Jeremy Cohan, "Lukács on Marx’s Hegelianism and the dialectic of Marxism"
Moderator: Chris Cutrone

The "bourgeois revolutions" from the 16th through the 19th centuries -- extending into the 20th -- conformed humanity to modern city life, ending traditional, pastoral, religious custom in favor of social relations of the exchange of labor. Abbé Sieyès wrote in 1789 that, in contradistinction to the clerical 1st Estate who "prayed" and the aristocratic 2nd Estate who "fought," the commoner 3rd Estate "worked:" "What has the 3rd Estate been? Nothing." "What is it? Everything." Kant warned that universal bourgeois society would be the mere midpoint in humanity's achievement of freedom. After the last bourgeois revolutions in Europe of 1848 failed, Marx wrote of the "constitution of capital," the ambivalent, indeed self-contradictory character of "free wage labor." In the late 20th century, the majority of humanity abandoned agriculture in favor of urban life -- however in "slum cities." How does the bourgeois revolution appear from a Marxian point of view? How did what Marx called the “proletarianization” of society circa 1848 signal not only the crisis and supersession, but the need to fulfill and “complete” the bourgeois revolution, whose task now fell to the politics of “proletarian” socialism, expressed by the workers’ call for “social democracy?” How did this express the attempt, as Lenin put it, to overcome bourgeois society “on the basis of capitalism” itself? How did subsequent Marxism lose sight of Marx on this, and how might Marx’s perspective on the crisis of the bourgeois revolution in the 19th century still resonate today?


audio recording


The Marxism of Second International radicalism: Lenin, Luxemburg, and Trotsky

Chris Cutrone, Lenin
Greg Gabrellas, Luxemburg
Ian Morrison, Trotsky
Moderator: Spencer Leonard

The legacy of revolution 1917-19 in Russia, Germany, Hungary and Italy is concentrated above all in the historical figures Vladimir Lenin, Rosa Luxemburg and Leon Trotsky, leaders of the Left in the Second International (1889-1914) -- what they called “revolutionary social democracy” -- in the period preceding the crisis of war, revolution, counterrevolution and civil war in World War I and its aftermath. In 1920, Georg Lukács summed up this experience as follows: “[T]he crisis [of capital] remains permanent, it goes back to its starting-point, repeats the cycle until after infinite sufferings and terrible detours the school of history completes the education of the proletariat and confers upon it the leadership of mankind. . . . Of course this uncertainty and lack of clarity are themselves the symptoms of the crisis in bourgeois society. As the product of capitalism the proletariat must necessarily be subject to the modes of existence of its creator. . . . inhumanity and reification.” Nonetheless, these Marxists understood their politics as being “on the basis of capitalism” itself (Lenin). How were the 2nd Intl. radicals, importantly, critics, and not merely advocates, of their own political movement? What is the legacy of these figures today, after the 20th century -- as Walter Benjamin said in his 1940 “Theses on the Philosophy of History,” “against the grain” of their time, reaching beyond it? How did Lenin, Luxemburg, and Trotsky contribute to the potential advancement and transformation of Marxism, in and through the crisis of Marxism in the early 20th century? How can we return to these figures productively, today, to learn the lessons of their history?


audio recording

Chris Cutrone, Platypus (School of the Art Institute of Chicago)
Andrew Feenberg (Simon Fraser University)
Richard Westerman (University of Chicago)
Respondent: Nicholas Brown (University of Illinois at Chicago)

Recently, the New Left Review published a translated conversation between the critical theorists Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer causing more than a few murmurs and gasps. In the course of their conversation, Adorno comments that he had always wanted to “develop a theory that remains faithful to Marx, Engels and Lenin, while keeping up with culture at its most advanced.” Adorno, it seems, was a Leninist. As surprising as this evidence might have been to some, is it not more shocking that Adorno’s politics, and the politics of Critical Theory, have remained taboo for so long? Was it really necessary to wait until Adorno and Horkheimer admitted their politics in print to understand that their primary preoccupation was with maintaining Marxism’s relation to bourgeois critical philosophy (Kant and Hegel)? This panel proposes to state the question as directly as possible and to simply ask: How did the practice and theory of Marxism, from Marx to Lenin, make possible and necessary the politics of Critical Theory?

Co-sponsored by the School of the Art Institute of Chicago Departments of Art Education, Art History, Liberal Arts, and Visual and Critical Studies, and the SAIC Student Association.


Download: http://www.archive.org/details/PlatypusForumThePoliticsOfCriticalTheory

A teach-in by Chris Cutrone

Tuesday, April 12, 2011
4:30 - 6:00 PM
School of the Art Institute of Chicago
112 S. Michigan Ave. room 601

Alain Badiou’s recent book (2010) is titled with the phrase promoted by his and Slavoj Zizek’s work for the last few years, “the communist hypothesis.” Zizek has spoken of “the Badiou event” as opening new horizons for both philosophy and communism. Badiou and Zizek share a background in Lacanian and Althusserian “post-structuralist” French thought, in common with other prominent post-New Left thinkers — and former students of Louis Althusser — such as Etienne Balibar and Jacques Rancière. Althusser found, in the Russian and Chinese Revolutions, a salutary challenge to the notion of the Hegelian “logic of history,” that revolutionary change could and indeed did happen as a matter of contingency. For Badiou, this means that emancipation must be conceived of as an “event,” which involves a fundamental reconsideration of ontology.


Audio recording

Write-up of first part of the presentation, "Badiou's 'communism' -- a gerontic disorder"

Suggested background readings:

Cutrone, “The Marxist Hypothesis: A Response to Badiou's 'Communist Hypothesis'” (2010)
Badiou, “The Communist Hypothesis” (2008)
Cutrone, “Chinoiserie: A Critique of the RCP, USA on Badiou” (2010)
Badiou, “Tunisia, Egypt: The Universal Reach of Popular Uprisings” (2011)
Wal Suchting, "Althusser's Late Thinking about Materialism" (2004)

Below are links to download the audio of all the Platypus panels at the Left Forum. (Nota bene: Several of the files begin after the panel was already underway, and others end before the panel concluded.)

The Bourgeois Revolution:
http://www.mediafire.com/?tiu68g34veevn1i

Lenin’s Marxism:
http://www.mediafire.com/?pql9pqnx5ziyl8n

Luxemburg’s Marxism:
http://www.mediafire.com/?4ojav6mcx7c02l1

Lukacs’s Marxism:
http://www.mediafire.com/?z116lxdp5z8m6fa

Aesthetics in Protests:
http://www.mediafire.com/?lycrdpnnc9hyx9l

Trotsky’s Marxism:
http://www.mediafire.com/?83yutmut4s8ny55

On the Politics of Alain Badiou:
http://www.mediafire.com/?bfmf5op6nl881ll

Marx and Engels’s Marxism:
http://www.mediafire.com/?84b33mzbmfsa86z

http://www.archive.org/details/RethinkingTheNewLeftchicago11910

Public forum of the Platypus Affiliated Society

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9TH 6:00 PM

UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE ASSEMBLY HALL
1414 EAST 59TH STREET

SPEAKERS:
Mark Rudd
Alan Spector
Osha Neumann
Tim Wohlforth

MODERATOR:
Spencer A. Leonard

The memory of the 1960s, which has long kindled contestation and debate on the means and ends of freedom politics, is rapidly fading into the political unconscious. The election of Barack Obama and the collapse of the anti-war movement mark the end of a period that has now come full circle. After a half-century of rebellion, many old New Left-ists now call for a “new New Deal” to return to welfare-statist and authoritarian society against which the New Left rebelled. History threatens to repeat itself, this time in an even more dimly recognized and ferocious form.

“In the United States today there is no Left,” C. Wright Mills declaimed in the waning months of the 1950s, making him one of the most beloved intellectuals of his generation, “political activities are monopolized by an irresponsible two-party system; cultural activities -- though formally quite free, tend to become nationalistic or commercial -- or merely private.” If Mills continues to speak to us, it is as a reminder of tasks long deferred, memories long repressed.

This panel attempts to address the current moment, in which many who participated in the moment of the New Left’s beginnings have survived a full cycle of history. Rather than a rehash of old debates or yet another nostalgia- ridden recap of the era, interventions which have ceased to offer critical perspective on the present, this panel seeks to ask the simple but fundamental question: What, if any, is significant for us today in the thwarted attempt by 1960s radicals to re-found emancipatory politics?

Co-sponsored by:
The Global Voices Lecture Program of International House, with the support of the University of Chicago Student Activities Fund